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Squeezing the Gambits: The Benko, Budapest, Albin and Blumenfeld

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Squeezing the Gambits: The Benko, Budapest, Albin and Blumenfeld Empty Squeezing the Gambits: The Benko, Budapest, Albin and Blumenfeld

Post  Gmde on Wed Dec 19, 2018 2:15 pm

  This book aims to teach you how to put Black into a positional squeeze in the most popular gambits against 1.d4. It offers a White repertoire based on understanding and not on memorisation of long variations. Georgiev preaches a solid strategic approach which allows to decrease the role of computer assisted home analysis and will serve you for many years. The structure of the book is similar to Georgiev's previous work, The Sharpest Sicilian. In the Main Ideas chapters, the author focuses on plans and ideas. He explains what to do after the opening, which pieces to exchange and which ones to keep. The author provides a full, step-by-step, branch by branch, theoretical coverage in the Step by Step chapters. You will also find complete games with extensive commentaries. "  
sunny cheers
Link 1    Directly get the file after decryption process only 5 MB click here  
Link 2 If you are a beginner then click here
Gmde
Thank you.

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Squeezing the Gambits: The Benko, Budapest, Albin and Blumenfeld Empty Any chance someone can upload this? In a Zippy format

Post  baronvaruj on Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:58 pm

Any chance someone can upload this? In a Zippy format

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Squeezing the Gambits: The Benko, Budapest, Albin and Blumenfeld Empty Squeezing the Gambits: The Benko, Budapest, Albin and Blumenfeld by Kiril Georgiev

Post  ChessCaissa on Wed Mar 20, 2019 1:03 am

baronvaruj wrote:Any chance someone can upload this? In a Zippy format

PDF (4.6 mb):
https://www86.zippyshare.com/v/tyXlgWjV/file.html

Thanks to the original uploader! sunny

Mirror:
http://rgho.st/7l68nBFTz


This book aims to teach you how to put Black into a positional squeeze in the most popular gambits against 1.d4. It offers a White repertoire based on understanding and not on memorisation of long variations. Georgiev preaches a solid strategic approach which allows to decrease the role of computer assisted home analysis and will serve you for many years. The structure of the book is similar to Georgiev's previous work, The Sharpest Sicilian. In the Main Ideas chapters, the author focuses on plans and ideas. He explains what to do after the opening, which pieces to exchange and which ones to keep. The author provides a full, step-by-step, branch by branch, theoretical coverage in the Step by Step chapters. You will also find complete games with extensive commentaries.

Product details
Paperback: 192 pages
Publisher: Chess Stars (2010)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 9548782758
ISBN-13: 978-9548782753

Review by Dennis Monokroussos


A REVIEW OF KIRIL GEORGIEV'S SQUEEZING THE GAMBITS
MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2010 AT 7:12PM
Kiril Georgiev’s Squeezing the Gambits (Chess Stars 2010). 192 pp.

Chances are that if you’re a club player who likes 1.d4, you prefer to keep things under control. It’s not that you’re never aggressive or are unwilling to calculate lines, but all things being equal, you’d prefer to avoid chaotic positions or situations where your opponent is able to whip up an initiative.

In many 1.d4 openings, you’re able to get your wish, but there are other openings where it’s harder to achieve that. What, for instance, do you do about the Albin and Budapest Gambits, or in a somewhat different vein the Benko and Blumenfeld Gambits? You could take up the Trompowsky, the Torre Attack or the Colle, but while those openings are playable it’s still a concession to leave the richer realm of d4 + c4 openings.

Another approach is to dive into theory with both feet. In Boris Avrukh’s excellent 2-volume 1.d4 repertoire, you’ll find all sorts of detailed main-line suggestions. For instance, Avrukh offers the following line against the Benko Gambit: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6 5.bxa6 g6 6.Nc3 Bxa6 7.g3 d6 8.Bg2 Bg7 9.Nf3 Nbd7 10.Rb1. The point of this latter move and its timing is tactical. If White castled instead, then after 10.0-0 Nb6 11.Rb1 would be too late due to 11…Bc4 with a double attack that regains the pawn, while 11.b3 Nxd5 exploits the long diagonal. After 10.Rb1 the theory has only just started, and in the next 11 or so pages in Avrukh’s book you’ll find plenty of variations continuing past move 20. Often the lines are based on precise, tactically worked-out variations, which means that a general understanding won’t be enough.

That’s no knock on his books, which are outstanding, but it means you’ve got some hard work ahead of you. Worse still, Black has some move order tricks that might avoid Avrukh’s analysis altogether. For instance, there’s 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.g3 c5!? 4.d5 b5 5.cxb5 a6 6.bxa6 d6 7.Nc3 Bg7 8.Bg2 Nbd7 9.Nf3 0-0 and White is in a sort of zugzwang here. (Thanks to Greg Steele for pointing out this move-order difficulty with Avrukh’s book.) The point is that if he castles, then 10…Bxa6 and 11.Rb1 is too late, as mentioned in the last paragraph. On the other hand, if White plays 10.Rb1, then after 10…Nb6 Black will meet 11.0-0 with 11…Bf5, while 11.e4 Bxa6 is good for Black now that the pawn is no longer on e2. (A major point of the 10.Rb1 line covered by Avrukh is that it keeps Black’s light-squared bishop out of play; here, no such luck.) The Benko is tricky like this – its intrinsic complication is magnified by its many move-order finesses.

So here we are, torn between Scylla and Charybdis, between low-risk but low-reward openings like the Torre “Attack” and the London System on the one hand and mounds of theoretical investigation on the other. Is there a third way?

That’s what Kiril Georgiev is offering in Squeezing the Gambits: reliable lines that are played by even very strong players, but that aren’t so sharp and trendy that one improvement will make the book obsolete and a single error won’t cost you the game. In the case of the Benko Gambit, which dominates the book’s coverage, it means declining the gambit.

Of course, there are many ways to decline the Benko, such as 4.a4, 4.Qc2, 4.cxb5 a6 5.b6 and Georgiev’s preference of 4.Nf3. He does an excellent job of making the case for the latter option, and in so doing helps the reader understand what the system is about. To elaborate:

4.Nf3 vs. 4.a4. Comparing 4.a4 bxc4 5.Nc3 d6 6.e4 g6 7.Bxc4 with 4.Nf3 g6 5.cxb5 a6 6.b6 Qxb6 7.Nc3 d6 8.e4 favors White in two ways. First, c4 is cleared for the knight, which can make much better use of that square than the bishop; second, a7-a6 is a “horrible ‘asset’”, as Georgiev puts it, because it not only takes a6 away from Black’s pieces, which can use it, but also because it can become a fixed target after White plays a4-a5. (And a third problem: Nc4-b6 might be possible someday.)

4.Nf3 vs. 4.Qc2. A drawback of the latter is that the queen leaves the d5 pawn unattended, which gives Black some sharp possibilities with 4…e6. That’s possible against 4.Nf3 as well, but it won’t have the same effect. (More on this below.)

4.Nf3 vs. 4.cxb5 a6 5.b6. In some lines the two transpose to each other; the differences come in what they avoid. The latter line avoids 4…b4, while the former avoids a particular …e6 line that leads to a relative dry and drawish middlegame with only heavy pieces left on the board. White enjoys lasting pressure and has practically no losing chances there, but relatively few winning chances, too.

After 4.Nf3, Georgiev covers a slew of moves: 4…bxc4, 4…Bb7, 4…b4, 4…d6 and 4…g6. But what about 4…e6? As far as I can tell, there is no place in the Benko chapter where he covers this move or mentions some other place where it is covered. In fact, it is covered in the book, in its own chapter – the reader just has to realize that the game has transposed into the Blumenfeld Counter-Gambit. That normally arises after the moves 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 c5 4.d5 b5, and that’s the move order given in the book as well, in the fourth chapter. (Funny enough, he doesn’t mention the transposition in that chapter either.

Maybe he does mention the link somewhere, but I didn’t see it. It should have been mentioned, and given that the one opening turns into the other, it would have made more sense to have the Blumenfeld chapter right after the one on the Benko, instead of putting them on opposite ends of the book, separated by the chapters on the Budapest and Albin gambits.

Happily, that’s about all that’s wrong with the book, as far as I’ve seen so far. Georgiev does a great job in the Benko chapter of providing both strategic understanding (pointing out what features of the position matter and why, giving typical plans, etc.), laying out the important move order issues and giving the specific theory the reader needs. The other chapters are briefer and a bit more focused on details than general ideas (in part because the play becomes concrete more quickly), but where applicable he provides strategic detail and general tips there, too.

I like the book, and can happily recommend it to 1.d4 players rated 1800 and up.



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