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How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis

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How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis Empty How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis

Post  ChessCaissa on Wed Feb 27, 2019 12:33 am

PDF (2 mb):
http://rgho.st/7llMTWVvt

Thanks to the original uploader! sunny


Product details
Series: Cadogan Chess Books
Paperback: 110 pages
Publisher: Cadogan Books; 1st ed edition (January 1, 1992)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1857440188
ISBN-13: 978-1857440188

SOME AMAZON REVIEWS:

"Grandmaster Mednis died in 2002, not quite 65--far too young. After finishing second in the 1955 World Junior Championship behind Boris Spassky, in 1962 he was the first player to beat Bobby Fischer in a U.S. Championship. Despite these notable early achievements as a player, Mednis made his mark primarily as a chess author. I have this book, it is carefully written and of outstanding quality like most of Mednis's work, it will help you win more games, and you will enjoy reading it. I can unreservedly recommend this book and any other book by this model chess author. I only wish he had lived to write many more. Let me add that this book, a slim paperback, is well-printed and attractively designed."

"This book contains hardly any chess content, but I recommend it because it gives helpful tips to the new tournament player about training and preparation, how many events to play, coordinating chess with other activities.

Very good for adult beginners especially, though younger players will benefit. This is a "light" book, but helpful."

"There is more than just knowing how to play chess that goes into being successful in chess tournaments. Edmar Mednis presents a collection of ideas to prepare the chess player for tournament play.

The book includes a heavy emphasis on deciding what openings to play or learn depending on your style of preference. For those who enjoy slow methodical games that tend to result in close end games, closed style of openings are better to learn. Those who enjoy tactical wars should be more inclined to play openings that produce more open games. While opening play does not make the player, lack of knowing a good one often proves to be a major disadvantage, thus explaining Mednis's emphasis.

Mednis also discusses in depth how to analyze games, your own and your opponents. It is important to understand that this book is geared to the tournament player who plays at a level where his opponent's games are readily available for examination - this obviously excludes many chess enthusiasts as this is typically only a feature at master level tournaments or above.

The material is of good quality and the game analysis is helpful, I am just not certain that among the multitude of chess books available that this should be high on your list."

"This book is a guilty pleasure. I dearly love it and have read it many times. But it's a horrible book.

Whole pages are copy/pasted from Mednis's other books. He digresses into games or opening lines he finds interesting for long, unrelated passages. He suggests a repertoire...and then says "a comprehensive discussion of these variations forms the core of my book..." A list of variations and a sales pitch is all you'll get. Hilariously, when he recommends books for aspiring players to read, almost the entire list is his own. In other places, he'll suggest an opening and then casually mention he's written a book on that opening.

He has a Q&A at the end of each chapter, but the questions are rarely relevant. E.g., "evaluate the position reached after the following moves (which ends on move 15). Who is better? Give reasons." What on Earth this has to do with being a better tournament player I don't know. How often will you reach that exact position? And then you find it's from a Fischer game from 1959.

Another question he devotes half a page to answering is "What should be the opening repertoire for White of former World Champions Tigran Petrosian and Mikhail Tal?" What relevance is this to being a better tournament player? You're not going to meet them across the board...

Keep in mind this whole book is only 90 pages.

Now...why do I love it? But what's fun is the inside look at GM play from that era. The advice is woefully out of date - game databases are available on diskettes you say? - and much of the actual practical advice is either obvious (before the game, I should know what my first move is, etc.) or very shallow in information compared to the amount of text. But there are a lot of fun moments like how he evolved his Slav Defense (admittedly, it's only one page), his examples of GM move order tricks, how to decide on objectives (win/draw OK), how manage time, using repertoire tricks, etc.

It's nothing you can't find elsewhere better, but the point is that now it's all written from a 21st century computer-based perspective, whereas here you're (a) getting a historical view, and (b) hearing a GM talk about it."

ChessCaissa

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How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis Empty Re: How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis

Post  alira123 on Wed Feb 27, 2019 2:59 pm

ChessCaissa wrote:PDF (2 mb):
http://rgho.st/7llMTWVvt

Thanks to the original uploader! sunny


Product details
Series: Cadogan Chess Books
Paperback: 110 pages
Publisher: Cadogan Books; 1st ed edition (January 1, 1992)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1857440188
ISBN-13: 978-1857440188

SOME AMAZON REVIEWS:

"Grandmaster Mednis died in 2002, not quite 65--far too young. After finishing second in the 1955 World Junior Championship behind Boris Spassky, in 1962 he was the first player to beat Bobby Fischer in a U.S. Championship. Despite these notable early achievements as a player, Mednis made his mark primarily as a chess author. I have this book, it is carefully written and of outstanding quality like most of Mednis's work, it will help you win more games, and you will enjoy reading it. I can unreservedly recommend this book and any other book by this model chess author. I only wish he had lived to write many more. Let me add that this book, a slim paperback, is well-printed and attractively designed."

"This book contains hardly any chess content, but I recommend it because it gives helpful tips to the new tournament player about training and preparation, how many events to play, coordinating chess with other activities.

Very good for adult beginners especially, though younger players will benefit. This is a "light" book, but helpful."

"There is more than just knowing how to play chess that goes into being successful in chess tournaments. Edmar Mednis presents a collection of ideas to prepare the chess player for tournament play.

The book includes a heavy emphasis on deciding what openings to play or learn depending on your style of preference. For those who enjoy slow methodical games that tend to result in close end games, closed style of openings are better to learn. Those who enjoy tactical wars should be more inclined to play openings that produce more open games. While opening play does not make the player, lack of knowing a good one often proves to be a major disadvantage, thus explaining Mednis's emphasis.

Mednis also discusses in depth how to analyze games, your own and your opponents. It is important to understand that this book is geared to the tournament player who plays at a level where his opponent's games are readily available for examination - this obviously excludes many chess enthusiasts as this is typically only a feature at master level tournaments or above.

The material is of good quality and the game analysis is helpful, I am just not certain that among the multitude of chess books available that this should be high on your list."

"This book is a guilty pleasure. I dearly love it and have read it many times. But it's a horrible book.

Whole pages are copy/pasted from Mednis's other books. He digresses into games or opening lines he finds interesting for long, unrelated passages. He suggests a repertoire...and then says "a comprehensive discussion of these variations forms the core of my book..." A list of variations and a sales pitch is all you'll get. Hilariously, when he recommends books for aspiring players to read, almost the entire list is his own. In other places, he'll suggest an opening and then casually mention he's written a book on that opening.

He has a Q&A at the end of each chapter, but the questions are rarely relevant. E.g., "evaluate the position reached after the following moves (which ends on move 15). Who is better? Give reasons." What on Earth this has to do with being a better tournament player I don't know. How often will you reach that exact position? And then you find it's from a Fischer game from 1959.

Another question he devotes half a page to answering is "What should be the opening repertoire for White of former World Champions Tigran Petrosian and Mikhail Tal?" What relevance is this to being a better tournament player? You're not going to meet them across the board...

Keep in mind this whole book is only 90 pages.

Now...why do I love it? But what's fun is the inside look at GM play from that era. The advice is woefully out of date - game databases are available on diskettes you say? - and much of the actual practical advice is either obvious (before the game, I should know what my first move is, etc.) or very shallow in information compared to the amount of text. But there are a lot of fun moments like how he evolved his Slav Defense (admittedly, it's only one page), his examples of GM move order tricks, how to decide on objectives (win/draw OK), how manage time, using repertoire tricks, etc.

It's nothing you can't find elsewhere better, but the point is that now it's all written from a 21st century computer-based perspective, whereas here you're (a) getting a historical view, and (b) hearing a GM talk about it."


thanks ChessCaissa for sharing good files
do you have Tactics - from Basics to Brilliance VOL 5
if you have it plz upload here: http://www.chessgod101.com/t7935-tactics-from-basics-to-brilliance-vol-5

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How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis Empty How to Be a Complete Tournament Player 1991 Scale fixed

Post  sorbet on Wed Feb 27, 2019 3:52 pm

I have fixed scale so all the pages are the same size. How to Be a Complete Tournament Player 1991 Scale fixed.

http://rgho.st/7q9dDCFSP


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How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis Empty Re: How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis

Post  sorbet on Fri Mar 01, 2019 5:03 pm

sorbet wrote:I have fixed scale so all the pages are the same size. How to Be a Complete Tournament Player 1991 Scale fixed.

http://rgho.st/7q9dDCFSP


Someone send me a private mail asking how I fixed the scales. There are plenty of tools. It's just a matter finding them. The site below gives a poor man's version/tools to do a quick and dirty job. Go to

http://www.pdfaid.com/

scroll down to Scale PDF Pages. Now anyone can fix a pile of books and collect points.

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How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis Empty Re: How to Be a Complete Tournament Player by Edmar Mednis

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