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Winning the Won Game by Danny Kopec , Lubomir Ftacnik

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 Winning the Won Game by Danny Kopec , Lubomir Ftacnik  Empty Winning the Won Game by Danny Kopec , Lubomir Ftacnik

Post  ChessCaissa on Fri Mar 29, 2019 1:43 am

PDF (17.8 mb):
https://www32.zippyshare.com/v/bfLgXrOa/file.html
https://dropmefiles.com/C8Tg9

Thanks to the original uploader (CS29797 at Immortalchess)! sunny

All players who aspire to chess mastery need to learn the techniques for winning a won game: that means they must better recognize the positional advantages they already have and know how to use them to get closer to victory. The examples laid out here will help them do exactly that. Each one comes from the most brilliantly played games at the Women’s and Men’s United States Championships in the past 20 years—games that have won a special $2,000 prize for excellence, donated by Paul M. Albert Jr. Players at all levels will benefit from the moves presented, described, and illustrated here, all with illuminating commentary.

About the Author
International Chess Master Danny Kopec is Associate Professor of Computer and Information science at Brooklyn College in New York City. He has published 6 chess books and produced 8 instructional Chess DVD's totalling 18.5 hours

Full title: Winning the Won Game: Lessons from the Albert Brilliancy Prizes

Editorial Reviews
About the Author
International Chess Master Danny Kopec is Associate Professor of Computer and Information science at Brooklyn College in New York City. He has published 6 chess books and produced 8 instructional Chess DVD's totalling 18.5 hours

Product details
Paperback: 192 pages
Publisher: Batsford; 1st edition (September 1, 2004)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0713489006
ISBN-13: 978-0713489002

A Seagaard Chess Review:

"Quick-Review: Winning the Won Game
- Lessons from the Alburt Brilliancy Prize
In an overcrowded market, chess writers and booksellers are becoming increasingly desperate to sell their product. We see here the result, with two of the silliest and most misleading titles you are ever likely to witness taking up space on a groaning chess bookstall. I will later take a look at the book "The Very Unusual Book About Chess", but let's start with "Winning the won game".

Upon receiving "Winning the won game" I was expecting a book about technique. After all, what is winning the won game all about? And given the reputation and previous works of the authors, I was looking forward to some excellent teaching material and to pick up a few good tips. What we actually have is a collection of brilliancy prize games from the US Championship,over the course of a decade or so, which vary in quality, and have NOTHING to do with winning won games at all, despite a silly section at the beginning where Kopec and Paul M Alburt try to justify the title of the book.

The games are pleasantly annotated, no more and we never get to know who has done what in this book. Did Kopec write the prose and leave the analysis to Ftacnik? I would have liked to have known. My guess is that someone collated the games and asked Kopec to make a book out of it. Ftacnik was hired as a name and to provide some analysis. They couldn't find a sexy title so they ended up with the one above. If you are a fan of games collections and brilliancy prizes in particular, then you could do a lot worse. The majority of the games are entertaining. I give this book 5/10 - Nothing special.

As a brief illustration I give the contents page. One can smell the bull a mile off.



Contents
With page numbers and capital letters as presented in the book

Acknowledgements (4)
Foreword by Paul M Alburt Jr (5)
Introduction: The Notion of Brilliance and Winning a Won Game (11)
Brilliancy and Beauty in Chess: Perspectives of Great Players (13)
Winning the Won Game (15)
List of Paul M Alburt Jr US Championship Brilliancy Prize Winners (17)
GM Ljubomir Ftacnik's Top Ten Brilliancy Prize Winners (22)
Ranking of Brilliancy Prize Winners (24). So Ftacnik's Top Ten only took 2 pages ???
Technical Ranking of Brilliancy Prize Winners (26)
Symbols and Abbreviations (28)
Paul M Alburt Jr US Championship Brilliancy Prize Games (29)
Index of Games (208)"

From the review by G. Chandler:

"So once again you ask, do Kopec and Ftacnik do the games justice?

Yes. The authors have taken these brilliant games, highlighted the instructive points and walked the reader through the analysis in a clear and enlightening manner. I can nit pick and say that game No.63 seems to be poorly annotated. Its lack of notes really stands out. But that is because the other 63 games are so well annotated. Perhaps it was lack of space and the authors were told to lose a few pages.

Also, I have a slight quibble regarding the title. There is an excellent book out there called Simple Chess by Michael Stean. I often see it laying around in second hand shops. This really is a good Chess book but its title makes it look like a beginners’ book and it is thus ignored by the players it was aimed at. I always buy it and pass it onto a player who I know would benefit from it. One player I gave it to actually put a brown paper cover on it so people would not think he was reading a beginners’ book. This is true. His name was Alastair Macintosh.

Winning the Won Game conjures up a book full of classic and well known positions with ‘White to play and win’ type puzzles. 64 Brilliancy Prize Winning Games would, in my opinion, have been a more catchy

title.

But these are minor points. In a nutshell: Winning the Won Game is an excellent Chess book and highly recommended. That’s the trouble with good Chess books, there is not much else to say."

ChessCaissa

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