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Current date/time is Sun Aug 18, 2019 11:50 am

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chessbase 15

timeonoff wrote:My understanding is:

The latest update includes all previous updates.
So you only need to install the latest update.

equinox wrote:
Hi folks,

Is it mandatory to install all previous patches to install the current one? I mean, do I need to install patches #5, #4, etc... in order to install #6?
Am I clear?

Tks in advance!



Tkss again!
by equinox
on Sun Feb 10, 2019 12:46 pm
 
Search in: General
Topic: chessbase 15
Replies: 113
Views: 16745

chessbase 15

My understanding is:

The latest update includes all previous updates.
So you only need to install the latest update.

equinox wrote:
Hi folks,

Is it mandatory to install all previous patches to install the current one? I mean, do I need to install patches #5, #4, etc... in order to install #6?
Am I clear?

Tks in advance!
by timeonoff
on Sun Feb 10, 2019 9:26 am
 
Search in: General
Topic: chessbase 15
Replies: 113
Views: 16745

chessbase 15

ChemChess wrote:This link does not seem to work. Could someone please kindly provide another link to update 15.6?

jiri wrote:Update 6 is out.
Download update (32/64-bit):
 https://www115.zippyshare.com/v/DGD6HzzZ/file.html



Hi folks,

Is it mandatory to install all previous patches to install the current one? I mean, do I need to install patches #5, #4, etc... in order to install #6?
Am I clear?

Tks in advance!
by equinox
on Sun Feb 10, 2019 9:03 am
 
Search in: General
Topic: chessbase 15
Replies: 113
Views: 16745

Chess.com Videos.

This is the content (27 GB):

Six directories:

Amazing games
Endgames
Openings
Rules and Basics
Strategy
Tactics


These are the contained files:

Amazing games\2012 American Open  Believing In Your Plans
Amazing games\2012 American Open  Light Square Domination
Amazing games\2012 World Open Stories  Gift After Gift!
Amazing games\2012 World Open Stories  Losing Focus!
Amazing games\2012 World Open Stories  The Critical Round 8!
Amazing games\2012 World Open Stories  The Critical Round 8, Part 2!
Amazing games\A Blunder To Remember
Amazing games\A Coach's Perspective  The Greatest Comeback 1
Amazing games\A Coach's Perspective  The Greatest Comeback 2
Amazing games\A Cool Checkmate 1
Amazing games\A Cool Checkmate 2
Amazing games\A GM's Private Collection  vs FM Stojic
Amazing games\A GM's Private Collection  vs GM Chao
Amazing games\A GM's Private Collection  vs GM Malakhatko
Amazing games\A GM's Private Collection  vs IM Illingworth
Amazing games\A Great Game at a Great Time
Amazing games\A Lesson in the Scotch
Amazing games\A Motivating Story, and Spassky Petrosian 1966
Amazing games\Accelerated Dragon 9  Perelshteyn's Pet!
Amazing games\Amateur Analysis  Momentum When Down the Exchange
Amazing games\Amateur Analysis
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Alekhine's Atta
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Attack the Kingside 1
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Attack the Kingside 3
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Dominate the Center!
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Magic Outpost Part 1
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Magic Outpost Part 2
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Morphy's Genius 1
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Morphy's Genius 2
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Pillsbury's Attack
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Positional Strangulation - Part 2
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Positional Strangulation - Part 3
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Positional Strangulation - Part 4
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Positional Strangulation - Part 5
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Tunnel Vision
Amazing games\Amazing Games for Beginners  Unusual Wizardry!
Amazing games\An American Classic
Amazing games\An Instructive Attacking Game
Amazing games\Analysis From London  Kramnik vs. Polgar
Amazing games\Anand v. Topalov; WCC G 1
Amazing games\Battle With Zenyuk - Part 1
Amazing games\Beauty and Entertainment 1
Amazing games\Becoming an Expert - Part 1  Attack with Pawns!
Amazing games\Becoming an Expert - Part 2  Attack with Pieces!
Amazing games\Becoming an Expert - Part 3  Kasparov's Rxc3!
Amazing games\Becoming an Expert - Part 4  Petrosian Attacks!
Amazing games\Becoming an Expert - Part 5  Bad Calculation 1
Amazing games\Becoming an Expert - Part 7  Kramnik's Center!
Amazing games\Becoming an Expert - Part 8  Kramnik's Center 2!
Amazing games\Becoming an Expert - Part 9  Using Open Files!
Amazing games\Berkeley International 2011! Kiewra vs GM Bojkov
Amazing games\Brotherly Love  Shanky's Philly Battles - Game 1
Amazing games\Brotherly Love  Shanky's Philly Battles - Game 2
Amazing games\Brotherly Love  Shanky's Philly Battles - Game 3!
Amazing games\Chess960! v.1 (Fischer Random Chess)
Amazing games\Chess960! v.3 (Fischer Random Chess)
Amazing games\Chess960! v.4 (Fischer Random Chess)
Amazing games\Climax in World Championship Matches
Amazing games\Coach Dejan Explains  A Champion is Born - Part 1
Amazing games\Coach Dejan Explains  A Champion is Born - Part 2
Amazing games\Coach Dejan Explains  A Champion is Born - Part 3
Amazing games\Connecting the Dots   Making Consistent Plans
Amazing games\Crazy Chess  Sacrifice in the Sicilian!
Amazing games\David and Goliath  Samuel Sevian vs GM Flores
Amazing games\Decisive Final Round! IM Sevillano vs GM Bojkov
Amazing games\Defense   Prophylaxis 7  Leko vs. Caruana!
Amazing games\Defense   Prophylaxis 8  Stay Put and Hold!
Amazing games\Dynamic Play 4  Winning Piece Placement
Amazing games\Ehlvest v. Shankland, Chicago Open Part 2
Amazing games\Everything You Need to Know  Bringing It Together!
Amazing games\Fiasco Positional Disaster
Amazing games\Fighting Chess!
Amazing games\Fire on the Board  Chaos in the Schliemann
Amazing games\Fire on the Board  Game vs FM Adamson
Amazing games\Fire on the Board  Video Author Duel vs GM Bojkov
Amazing games\Fireworks  IQP Battle Against FM Adamson!
Amazing games\Future Champions  Novelty in the French
Amazing games\Future Champions  Rebounding from a Tough Loss 1
Amazing games\Future Champions  Rebounding from a Tough Loss 2
Amazing games\Game Analysis  GM Nepomniachtchi v. GM Jobava
Amazing games\Game Analysis  Karpov v. Kasparov, Rapid (1)
Amazing games\Game Analysis  Khachiyan v. Shankland, US Champs
Amazing games\Game Analysis  Kramnik v. Svidler Tal Memorial
Amazing games\Game Analysis  Ponomariov v. Gelfand
Amazing games\Game Analysis  Short v. Efimenko Match (1)
Amazing games\Game Analysis; Ehlvest v. Shankland, Chicago Open
Amazing games\Gelfand goes Berserk
Amazing games\Gems from the 2012 US Championship - Part 1
Amazing games\Gems from the 2012 US Championship - Part 2
Amazing games\Gems from the 2012 US Championship - Part 3
Amazing games\Gems from the 2012 US Championship - Part 4
Amazing games\Gems from the 2012 US Championship - Part 5
Amazing games\Gems from the 2012 US Championship - Part 6
Amazing games\Gems from the 2012 US Championship - Part 7
Amazing games\Gems from the 2012 US Championship - Part 8
Amazing games\Great Endgame Tips  Playing with the Bishops!
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 10
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 11
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 8
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Alexander Alekhine
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Anatoly Karpov - Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Anatoly Karpov - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Bobby Fischer - Part 4
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Bobby Fischer Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Bobby Fischer Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Bobby Fischer Part 3
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Bobby Fischer Part 5
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Boris Spassky - Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Boris Spassky - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Capablanca - Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Capablanca - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Capablanca - Part 3
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Capablanca - Part 4
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Capablanca - Part 5
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Capablanca - Part 6
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Capablanca - Part 7
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Capablanca - Part 8
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  David Bronstein Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  David Bronstein Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Efim Geller
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Efim Geller - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Efim Geller - Part 3
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Emanuel Lasker - Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Emanuel Lasker - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Emanuel Lasker - Part 3
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Emanuel Lasker - Part 4
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Emanuel Lasker - Part 5
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Gligoric - Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Leonid Stein - Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Leonid Stein - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Mikhail Botvinnik
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Mikhail Botvinnik - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Mikhail Tal Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Mikhail Tal Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Paul Keres
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Paul Keres - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Samuel Reshevsky
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Tigran Petrosian
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Vasily Smyslov
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Viktor Korchnoi
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Viswanathan Anand Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Viswanathan Anand Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Viswanathan Anand Part 3
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Wilhelm Steinitz - Part 1
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Wilhelm Steinitz - Part 2
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Wilhelm Steinitz - Part 3
Amazing games\Greatest Chess Minds  Wilhelm Steinitz - Part 4
Amazing games\How to Analyze Your Own Games  Beginner to Intermediate Level Players
Amazing games\How to Analyze Your Own Games 1  vs GM Atalik
Amazing games\How to Analyze Your Own Games 2  vs IM Yang
Amazing games\How to Analyze Your Own Games 3  vs IM Sevillano!
Amazing games\How to Change the Course of the Game 2
Amazing games\How To Improve Your Chess 4
Amazing games\How To Improve Your Chess 5
Amazing games\Ignoring General Principles
Amazing games\IM Shankland vs. IM Rensch!
Amazing games\In Search of Beauty
Amazing games\Instructive Analysis of Chess.com Member Games 2
Amazing games\Into the Fire
Amazing games\Keeping Up With Melik  Top Defense
Amazing games\Keeping up with Melik  Victory vs GM Ramirez!
Amazing games\Keeping Up with Melik  Victory vs. IM Kiewra!
Amazing games\Lasker vs. Capablanca, 1914
Amazing games\Last Round Play; vs. Super GM Loek Van Wely
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids  Gambit or Technique
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids  How to Create an Attack!
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids  Meet GambitGareth!
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids  Put Them Out of Their Misery
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids; A Back and Forth Battle - Part 1!
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids; A Back and Forth Battle - Part 2!
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids; Develop Plans... Not Pieces!
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids; Double the Fun!
Amazing games\Live Session Hybrids; Dysfunctional Development!
Amazing games\Live Sessions  Achieve Equality First!
Amazing games\Live Sessions 10; One Move at a Time
Amazing games\Live Sessions 11; One Move at a Time
Amazing games\Live Sessions 7; One Move at a Time
Amazing games\Live Sessions 8; One Move at a Time
Amazing games\Live Sessions 9; One Move at a Time
Amazing games\Live Sessions, Back As Black!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Guaranteed Loss  
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Lack of Communication!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Little IQP Technique!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Miniature and a Medley!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Move-Order Mishap!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Quick Fix for Blitz!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Resourceful Defense - Part 1!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Resourceful Defense - Part 2!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Shot in the Dark!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Smith-Morra Prayer!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Space Advantage with Time!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Tale of Missed Opportunities!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; A Thrown Away Victory!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; An 'Isolated' Incident!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; An Opposite 'Coloured' English!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Back with an Attack!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Bad Endgames, a Lesson Learned!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Bishop vs Knight Technique!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Capitalizing On the Initiative!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Crazy Pawns! A Dynamic Imbalance...
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Danny IS Fried Liver!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Fighting for the Initiative!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Fire on the Open File!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Hoping for a Dynamic Future!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; How Equal It Is
Amazing games\Live Sessions; How to Beat Mediocre Openings!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Know when to Hold, Know when to Fold!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Lose Some...Win Some!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Love to Win, Hate to Lose!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Minority Attack Dominance!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Misplayed Positional Ideas
Amazing games\Live Sessions; One Move at a Time 5
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Practical Pressure!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Punishing Obvious Mistakes!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Rematch!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Shankland's Maiden Voyage!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Shanky's Return
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Slips of Mice and Men
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Technique Psychology
Amazing games\Live Sessions; The 1.b3 Chicken System!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; The 2nd Time's the Charm!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; The Blunder That Never Was!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; The Five Keys of Technique!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; The Powerful Pony!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; The Theory of Dynamic Compensation!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; The Ugly Truth!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; The Unslayable Dragon!
Amazing games\Live Sessions; Unbalanced Material
Amazing games\Making Consistent Plans - Part 2  vs. NM Graves
Amazing games\Making Consistent Plans - Part 3  vs. NM Yanayt
Amazing games\MATCH OF THE CENTURY  Fischer-Spassky G 6
Amazing games\Meeting GM Khachiyan  Exchange Sacrifice
Amazing games\Meeting GM Khachiyan  Material Imbalance
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Buried Alive!
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Difficult Defensive Task
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Fighting for the Initiative
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Fried Queen in the Fried Liver
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Handing Over the Initiative
Amazing games\Member Analysis  How To Use Dominant Pieces
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Instructive and Unbalanced Errors
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Interesting Mating Attack
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Lack of a Plan
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Long Term Compensation
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Never Assume Anything!
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Priceless, Practical Advice!
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Principles In the King's Gambit
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Right Idea, Wrong Execution!
Amazing games\Member Analysis  The Forgotten Servant of Strategy!
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Understanding   Using the Center!
Amazing games\Member Analysis  Violation of Basic Principles
Amazing games\Most Instructive Games Ever, Game 1, Part 1
Amazing games\Most Mysterious World Championship  The Story
Amazing games\Most Mysterious World Championship Match 2
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship  vs GM Kaidanov
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship 2  vs GM Christiansen
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship 3  vs GM Shabalov
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship 4  Match vs GM Onischuk 1
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship 5  Match vs GM Onischuk 2
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship 6  Match vs GM Onischuk 3
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship 7  Semi Final vs GM Kamsky
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship 8  Match vs GM Hess 1
Amazing games\My 2011 US Championship 9  Armageddon Final Round!
Amazing games\My Best Games  vs GM Lev Alburt
Amazing games\My Best Games  vs. GM Grigorian
Amazing games\My Best Games  vs. Speelman   Kupreichik
Amazing games\My Best Games vs Francisco Trois
Amazing games\My Best Games vs. GM Walter Browne
Amazing games\My Best Games vs. IM Herzog and GM Garcia
Amazing games\My Best Games vs. IM Leski
Amazing games\My Game vs. Super-GM Michael Adams
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  2007 World Youth
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  2008 World Youth Part 1
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  2008 World Youth Part 2
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Crushing Lputian!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  First GM Scalp!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Following Steinitz!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  GM Ivanov - Part 1
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  GM Ivanov - Part 2
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Hanging up the Gloves
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Playing for the Win!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Reckless Abandon!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Spassky's Draw Offer!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Sveshnikov!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  The Final GM Norm
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Trusting Fritz!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Vegas Payday!
Amazing games\My Memorable Games  Young Shanky!
Amazing games\My Trip to Reno  A Strategic Affair Part 1
Amazing games\My Trip to Reno  A Strategic Affair Part 2
Amazing games\My Trip to Reno  The Money Round!
Amazing games\Nor-Cali International Battles  vs GM Meier - 1
Amazing games\Nor-Cali International Battles  vs GM Meier - 2
Amazing games\Nor-Cali International Battles  vs IM Bryant
Amazing games\Nor-Cali International Battles  vs IM Greg Shahade
Amazing games\Overcoming Adversity in Chess
Amazing games\Pawn Structure 101  Caro Slav - Anand's Brilliance!
Amazing games\Play Fighting Chess  Using the Initiative - Part 2
Amazing games\Play Fighting Chess  Using the Initiative - Part 3
Amazing games\Positional Compensation  Super Active Pieces!
Amazing games\Positional Sacrifice - Part 3  Best Game Prize!
Amazing games\Positional Tips  US Qualifier, vs GM Benjamin
Amazing games\Powerful Opening Sacrifice
Amazing games\Practical Defense 9 - vs. IM Amanov
Amazing games\Redeeming your Positional Advantage
Amazing games\Self Diagnosis  Curing Your Weak Spots!
Amazing games\Shankland Analyzes a Member's Game
Amazing games\Shankland vs IM Mandiza  Game for Beginners Part 1
Amazing games\Shankland vs IM Mandiza  Game for Beginners Part 2
Amazing games\Shankland's Summer Travels 1  vs. Sergey Perman
Amazing games\Shankland's Summer Travels 2  vs GM Ilya Nyzhnyk
Amazing games\Shankland's Summer Travels 3  vs GM Maxim Turov
Amazing games\Shankland's Summer Travels 5  vs GM Peter Leko 1
Amazing games\Shankland's Summer Travels 6  vs GM Peter Leko 2
Amazing games\Shankland's Summer Travels 7  vs GM Abhijeet Gupta
Amazing games\Shanky vs. Hammer!
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov - Part 10
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 1
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 2
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 3
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 4
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 5
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 6
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 7
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 8
Amazing games\Simply the Best  Garry Kasparov Part 9
Amazing games\Solitaire Chess - Part 1  Shirov's Play!
Amazing games\Solving the Problem of the Queen 1
Amazing games\Solving the Problem of the Queen 2
Amazing games\Stay Hungry - Part 1  Don't Get Intimidated!
Amazing games\Struggle for the Initiative
Amazing games\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #1
Amazing games\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #10
Amazing games\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #2
Amazing games\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #4
Amazing games\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #5
Amazing games\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #7
Amazing games\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #8
Amazing games\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #9
Amazing games\The 8th Round
Amazing games\The Active King  Triumphal Walk Part 2
Amazing games\The Blumenfeld Gambit Part 2  Amazing Example Game
Amazing games\The Boy Meets the Master
Amazing games\The Break Point 2
Amazing games\The Giant
Amazing games\The Modern Approach to Gambits 1
Amazing games\The Road to GM - Part 1  vs GM Kreiman
Amazing games\The Road to GM - Part 2  vs GM Georgiev
Amazing games\The Unexpected Move
Amazing games\The Year of the Carlsen; Part 1
Amazing games\The Year of the Carlsen; Part 2
Amazing games\Through an IM's Eyes
Amazing games\Torre Introduces the Torre Attack
Amazing games\Two Games with GM Pavel Blatny; Black
Amazing games\Two Games with GM Pavel Blatny; White
Amazing games\Unbalanced Material  BONUS - Pawns Win!
Amazing games\Unbalanced Material  Minors vs the Queen Part 1
Amazing games\Unexpected Turn
Amazing games\US Chess League  vs GM Nakamura
Amazing games\US Chess League  vs Jorge Sammour-Hasbun
Amazing games\US Chess League - Championship Game v. GM Becerra
Amazing games\US Chess League - vs. GM Gurevich
Amazing games\US Chess League - vs. GM Shulman
Amazing games\US Chess League vs. GM Benjamin
Amazing games\US Chess League vs. GM Lenderman
Amazing games\US Chess League vs. IM Milman
Amazing games\US Junior Championship III vs Hughes
Amazing games\US Junior Championship IV
Amazing games\US Junior Championship V
Amazing games\US Junior Championship V; Final Rounds!
Amazing games\USCL - Game of the Week; v FM Milat
Amazing games\USCL - Game of the Week; v. GM Kacheishvili
Amazing games\USCL - Game of The Week; v. WFM Abrahamyan
Amazing games\Why it is Better to Watch Videos than Read
Amazing games\World Youth 2010; FM Zierk vs. GM Durarbeyli
Amazing games\Yu v. Movsesian; World Cup 09


Endgames\Amazing Games for Beginners  Positional Strangulation - Part 1
Endgames\Amazing Games for Beginners  Rubi's Smooth Rook!
Endgames\Amazing Games for Beginners  Rubinstein's Endgame!
Endgames\Battle With Zenyuk - Part 2
Endgames\Berlin Endgames 8  File Control in Rook Endgames
Endgames\Berlin Endgames Part 2  Black's Pawn Nightmare!
Endgames\Berlin Endgames Part 3  The Knight Endgame
Endgames\Berlin Endgames Part 4  Bishops of the Same Color
Endgames\Berlin Endgames Part 5  Black's Strong Bishop Pair
Endgames\Berlin Endgames Part 6  Light-Squared Bishops!
Endgames\Berlin Endgames Part 7  The Dangerous e5-e6 Break
Endgames\Capitalizing on Positional Endgame Advantages
Endgames\Comedy of Mistakes
Endgames\Concrete Logical Approach to Endgame Positions
Endgames\Defense   Prophylaxis  Opposite Colored Bishops 1
Endgames\Defense   Prophylaxis  Opposite Colored Bishops 2
Endgames\Defense   Prophylaxis  Opposite Colored Bishops 3
Endgames\Defense   Prophylaxis 5  A Practical Endgame
Endgames\Defense   Prophylaxis 6  Carlsen's Tenacity!
Endgames\Development  Simplification
Endgames\Development  Simplification Continued
Endgames\Endgame Technique  Bishops of Opposite Color
Endgames\Endgame Technique  Zugzwang
Endgames\Essentials of Minor Piece Endgames
Endgames\Essentials of Minor Piece Endgames 2
Endgames\Everything You Need to Know  The Endgame!
Endgames\Following General Principles of Rook Endgames
Endgames\Future Champions  Never Give Up! Kayden's Fortress
Endgames\Getting Started with the Ruy Lopez 4
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 12
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 2
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 4
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 5
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 6
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 7
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Siegbert Tarrasch - Part 4
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Vasily Smyslov - Part 2
Endgames\Greatest Chess Minds  Wilhelm Steinitz - Part 6
Endgames\How I Prepared for the 2011 US Championship
Endgames\How to Think in the Endgame - Part 1
Endgames\How to Think in the Endgame - Part 2
Endgames\How to Think in the Endgame - Part 3
Endgames\Important Tips In Common Endgames
Endgames\Instructive Unorthodox Endgame Evaluation
Endgames\Introduction to Pawn Breakthoughs
Endgames\Isolated Queen Pawns  Convert to Endgame
Endgames\Isolated Queen Pawns  It's so Simple
Endgames\Isolated Queen Pawns  The Majors
Endgames\K+Q vs. K+R
Endgames\King and Pawn Endings  Bonus Video!
Endgames\King and Pawn Endings  Final Stage
Endgames\King and Pawn Endings  Stage 2
Endgames\King and Pawn Endings  Stage 3
Endgames\King and Pawn Endings  Stage 4
Endgames\King and Pawn Endings  The Basics!
Endgames\Learn to Love It  How to Study the Endgame!
Endgames\Mating with Queen vs. Rook Part 1 -- Philidor!
Endgames\Mating with Queen vs. Rook Part 2 -- Practice!
Endgames\Nursing a Minimal Advantage 1
Endgames\Nursing a Minimal Advantage 4
Endgames\One of the Most Instructive Endgames in History
Endgames\Pawn Endgames 1
Endgames\Pawn Endgames 2
Endgames\Pawn Endgames 3
Endgames\Pawn Endgames 4
Endgames\Playing in Mutual Time Pressure
Endgames\Practical   Essential Endgame Knowledge - Part 1!
Endgames\Practical   Essential Endgame Knowledge - Part 2!
Endgames\Practical Defense 8
Endgames\Precision Play In the Endgame
Endgames\Put That Piece in Jail! A Trapped Rook's Sad Story
Endgames\Queen v. Pawns  Magic Square Technique
Endgames\R+B v. R  Pressing!
Endgames\R+B v. R  the Defense!
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 1
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 10
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 2
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 3
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 4
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 5
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 6
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 7
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 8
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Beginner to Master, Part 9
Endgames\Rook Endgames  Masterful Bonus Video!
Endgames\Shankland's Summer Travels 8  Endgame Struggle!
Endgames\Spassky v. Petrosian; Game 19
Endgames\Stay Hungry - Part 2  Carlsen's Insatiable Appetite!
Endgames\Structural Thinking 4  Planning the Endgame!
Endgames\Structural Thinking 5  An Endgame Breakthrough!
Endgames\Taking Advantage of Small Endgame Mistakes
Endgames\Tata Endgames  Nobody's Perfect! - Part 1
Endgames\Tata Endgames  Nobody's Perfect! - Part 2
Endgames\Tata Endgames  Nobody's Perfect! - Part 3
Endgames\The Active King  Bishop Endgames
Endgames\The Active King  Complex Endgames
Endgames\The Active King  Knight Endgames!
Endgames\The Active King  Rook Endgames
Endgames\The Active King  Special Cases!
Endgames\The Principle of Two Weaknesses  Bonus Video!
Endgames\The Principle of Two Weaknesses 5
Endgames\The Road to GM - Part 4  vs IM Antal
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes 10  Bishop Fortress
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes 6  Lasker Abandoned!
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes 7  Rook vs Pawns
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes 8  Outside Passer!
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes 9  Rook   Pawn
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes I  Short   Long
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes II; Lasker's Defense
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes III
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes IV  Vancura
Endgames\Typical Rook Endgame Mistakes V  vs F   H Pawns!
Endgames\Unbalanced Material  Minors vs Rook Part 2
Endgames\Winning Queen vs Rook 1  The Philidor Position
Endgames\Winning Queen vs Rook 2  2nd Rank Defense!
Endgames\Winning Queen vs Rook 3  3rd Rank Defense!


Openings\A Guide for White  Avoiding the Sicilian - Alapin Part 1!
Openings\A Guide for White  Avoiding the Sicilian - Alapin Part 2!
Openings\A Guide for White  Avoiding the Sicilian - Alapin Part 3!
Openings\A Hacker's Guide to the Dutch  The Staunton!
Openings\A Universal System v. The Dutch
Openings\A Universal System vs. The King's Indian Attack
Openings\A Universal System vs. The King's Indian Attack 3
Openings\A Universal System vs. The King's Indian Attack 4
Openings\A Universal System vs. The King's Indian Attack II
Openings\Accelerated Dragon  The Maroczy Bind 1!
Openings\Accelerated Dragon  The Maroczy Bind 2!
Openings\Accelerated Dragon  The Maroczy Bind 3!
Openings\Accelerated Dragon  The Maroczy Bind 4!
Openings\Accelerated Dragon  The Maroczy Bind 5!
Openings\Accelerated Dragon 10  The Final Chapter!
Openings\Accelerated Dragon 6  Practical Game vs. IM Peters
Openings\Accelerated Dragon 7  Kasparov vs. Ivanchuk
Openings\Accelerated Dragon 8  The Hybrid Dragon
Openings\An Instructive Way to Handle the Closed Sicilian
Openings\An OTB Novelty
Openings\Analysis of Masters Game  Rensch vs Krush
Openings\Applying Principles in The King's Gambit II
Openings\Applying Principles in The King's Gambit III
Openings\Back To the Sicilian; Scheveningen v. GM Ramirez
Openings\Beating the Dragon Part 1
Openings\Beating the Dragon Part 2
Openings\Beating the Dutch  A Miniature by Nakamura
Openings\Benko Gambit Destruction
Openings\Berlin Endgames Part 1  Intro to the Structure!
Openings\Completely French  The Winawer - Part 1
Openings\Completely French  The Winawer - Part 2
Openings\Completely French  The Winawer - Part 3
Openings\Concepts in the Grand Prix Attack 1
Openings\Concepts in the Grand Prix Attack 2
Openings\Conquering Cochrane Concepts
Openings\Conquering Cochrane Concepts 2
Openings\Conquering Cochrane Concepts 3
Openings\Creating an Opening Repertoire
Openings\Creating an Opening Repertoire 2
Openings\Dealing with Passive Queen Pawn Openings
Openings\Dealing with Passive Queen Pawn Openings 2
Openings\Dealing with Passive Queen Pawn Openings 3
Openings\Dynamic Play 3  Typical Ideas in the Scheveningen
Openings\Easy and Ambitious System vs The French
Openings\Easy System vs The Caro Kann Part 2
Openings\Easy System vs The Caro-Kann
Openings\Easy Way to the Four Knights
Openings\Every Chess Opening  Defenses to 1.d4
Openings\Every Chess Opening  Defenses to 1.e4
Openings\Every Chess Opening  The First Move!
Openings\Everything You Need to Know  The Opening!
Openings\Exploiting Typical Opening Mistakes  Part 1
Openings\Four Knights Opening; Illustrative Games
Openings\Game Analysis  vs. GM Jaan Ehlvest
Openings\Getting Started with the Ruy Lopez 1
Openings\Getting Started with the Ruy Lopez 2
Openings\Getting Started with the Ruy Lopez 3
Openings\Grand Prix Attack  Winning Doubled Pawn Positions!
Openings\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 3
Openings\Greatest Chess Minds  Akiba Rubinstein - Part 9
Openings\Greatest Chess Minds  Siegbert Tarrasch - Part 3
Openings\Greatest Chess Minds  Siegbert Tarrasch - Part 5
Openings\Greatest Chess Minds  Wilhelm Steinitz - Part 7
Openings\How to Destroy the Hippo!
Openings\How to Develop an Opening Repertoire
Openings\How to Equalize as Black in the Evans Gambit
Openings\How to Play Against the Albin Counter Gambit!
Openings\How to Play the Queens Gambit I
Openings\How to Play the Queens Gambit II
Openings\How to Play the Queens Gambit III
Openings\How to Play the Queens Gambit IV
Openings\How to Play the Queens Gambit V
Openings\How to Play the Queens Gambit VI
Openings\Ideas for Black in the Leningrad Dutch
Openings\Ideas for White in the Leningrad Dutch  2.Nc3
Openings\Kaidanov's Comprehensive Repertoire  Alekhine and Scandinavian
Openings\Kaidanov's Comprehensive Repertoire  Combating the Caro Kann - Part 1
Openings\Kaidanov's Comprehensive Repertoire  Combating the Caro Kann - Part 2
Openings\Kaidanov's Comprehensive Repertoire  Facing the French
Openings\Kaidanov's Comprehensive Repertoire  Two Knights Defense - Part 2
Openings\Kaidanov's Comprehensive Repertoire  Two Knights Defense with Liver!
Openings\Kaidanov's Comprehensive Repertoire  Two Knights Sidelines   Evans!
Openings\Learn to Play the English - Part 1  Overview to 1...e5!
Openings\Learn to Play the English - Part 2  System with 3...c6!
Openings\Learn to Play the English - Part 3  At the Highest Level!
Openings\Learn to Play the English - Part 3  At the Highest Level! - Chess Videos - Chess.com2.mp4
Openings\Learn to Play the English - Part 4  Overview to 1...c5!
Openings\Learn to Play the English - Part 5  The Symmetrical Fianchetto!
Openings\Learn to Play the English - Part 6  Crossover into the Maroczy
Openings\Learn to Play the English - Part 7  Final Chapter
Openings\Liu Analyzes Retter-Gyrow 1
Openings\Member Analysis  Opening Potpourri!
Openings\Member Analysis  Third Time's the Charm!
Openings\Modern Benoni 1  The 'Amanovs' Thrilling Battle!
Openings\Modern Benoni 2  ...b5 Strikes Against the Center!
Openings\Modern Benoni 3  The Snake Benoni!
Openings\My Giuoco Piano
Openings\My Giuoco Piano 2
Openings\New Ideas in the Keres Attack - Part 1  6...Nc6
Openings\New Ideas in the Keres Attack - Part 2  6...e5
Openings\New Ideas in the Keres Attack - Part 3  6...h6
Openings\Opening Principles Explained
Openings\Opening Traps for Beginners  Countering the King's Gambit
Openings\Opening Traps for Beginners  Liver and Lolli!
Openings\Opening Traps for Beginners  Scholar's   Other f7 Tricks!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  Nimzowitsch's Defense!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The Caro Kann!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The English Opening!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The French Defense!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The Italian Game!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The Old Indian Defense!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The Queen's Gambit!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The Ruy Lopez!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The Sicilian Defense!
Openings\Openings for Beginners  The Two Knight's Defense!
Openings\Play Against the Petroff
Openings\Play Against the Petroff  2
Openings\Playing for Equality as Black 1
Openings\Playing for Equality as Black 2
Openings\Playing vs The Maroczy Bind I
Openings\Playing vs The Maroczy Bind II
Openings\Practical Pawn Play  Ideas in the Carlsbad System
Openings\Practical Pawn Play  The Reverse Benoni
Openings\QGD 1  Sidelines   the Tartakower Variation
Openings\QGD 2  The Lasker Variation
Openings\QGD 3  The Topical 5.Bf4
Openings\Recent Trends In The French; 3...Nc6
Openings\Recent Trends In the French; 3...Nc6 Mainlines
Openings\Recent Trends In the French; 3...Nc6, Leko Lost!
Openings\Recent Trends In the French; Greet v. Rendle
Openings\Recent Trends In the French; Tarrasch
Openings\Recent Trends In the French; Tarrasch Variation II
Openings\Saemisch Gambit, King's Indian Defense
Openings\Scandinavian 3...Qa5 Part 1  Main Line 4. d4!
Openings\Scandinavian 3...Qa5 Part 2  Critical Side Line!
Openings\Scandinavian 3...Qa5 Part 3  Alternatives to d4!
Openings\Scandinavian Qd6 Part 1
Openings\Scandinavian Qd6 Part 2
Openings\Semi-Slav 1  The Moscow Variation
Openings\Semi-Slav 2  The Anti-Moscow Gambit
Openings\Semi-Slav 3  The Botvinnik Variation
Openings\Semi-Slav 4  The Meran - 6.Qc2
Openings\Semi-Slav 5  The Meran - Main Lines!
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.Bc4 part 1
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.Bc4 part 2
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.Be2
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.Be3 e5
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.Be3 e6
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.Bg5
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.Bg5 Part 2
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.f4
Openings\Shankland Teaches the Najdorf  6.h3
Openings\Simple Chess  A Guide to The Semi-Tarrasch Defense
Openings\The 'Anti' Sicilians - Part 1  2... d-Pawn Moves!
Openings\The 'Anti' Sicilians - Part 2  2... Nf6   Others!
Openings\The 'Anti' Sicilians - Part 3  The Wing Gambit
Openings\The 'Anti' Sicilians - Part 4  Smith-Morra Gambit
Openings\The 'Anti' Sicilians - Part 5  System for Black!
Openings\The Blumenfeld Gambit Part 1  An Attacker's Guide!
Openings\The Blumenfeld Gambit Part 3  Declining the Beast!
Openings\The Bogo - Part 1  Overview of the Bogo-Indian
Openings\The Bogo-Indian - Part 2  4. Bd2 continued
Openings\The Bogo-Indian - Part 3  4. Nbd2
Openings\The Bogo-Indian - Part 4  Practical Example Game
Openings\The Bogo-Indian - Part 5  Example Games for 4.Bd2
Openings\The Bogo-Indian Part 6  Example Games with 4. Nbd2
Openings\The Classical Nimzo for Black - Part 1  5. a3
Openings\The Classical Nimzo for Black - Part 2  5. Nf3
Openings\The Classical Nimzo for Black - Part 3  5. e4
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 1  Sidelines First!
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 2  The Fantasy Variation
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 3  The Panov Attack!
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 4  Old Main Lines!
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 5  Advanced Variation 1!
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 6  Advanced Variation 2!
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 7  Laznicka beats Hou!
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 8  What Not To Do!
Openings\The Complete Caro - Part 9  Riazantsev Dominates!
Openings\The Complete Caro Kann - Introduction!
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Dynamic Provoking
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Example Game 1
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Exchange Sac
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Finale!
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Fischer's Masterpiece!
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Introduction
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Majority
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Piece Play
Openings\The Complete Grunfeld  Sidelines
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 1  g3, and Others!
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 10  A Random Summary!
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 2  The Ne2 Rubinstein!
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 3  4. Bg5 Leningrad!
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 4  The Saemisch Attack!
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 5  The Modern 4. f3 Line
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 6  The Huebner Variation
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 7  Huebner Alternatives!
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 8  5.Bd3, Nge2 Variation
Openings\The Complete Nimzo Indian 9  Roman's Classical!
Openings\The Evan's Gambit Part 1  with 5...Ba5
Openings\The Evans Gambit Part 2  with 5...Bc5 and 5...Be7
Openings\The Evans Gambit Part 3  5...Bd6 and Kaspy Wins!
Openings\The Evans Gambit Part 4  Exciting Example Game!
Openings\The Evans Gambit Part 5  Example Game - Conclusion
Openings\The Evans Gambit Part 6  Black Fights Back!
Openings\The Fighting Dragon - Part 1  The Yugoslav Attack
Openings\The Fighting Dragon - Part 2  9. 0-0-0 with Nxd4!
Openings\The Fighting Dragon - Part 3  9. 0-0-0 with d5!
Openings\The Fighting Dragon - Part 4  The Prophylactic 12...h5!
Openings\The Fighting Dragon - Part 5  Clash of the Titans
Openings\The Fighting Dragon - Part 6  The Offbeat 9. g4!
Openings\The Four Knights Opening  Intro!
Openings\The King's Indian Defense 6...Na6 Variation Part 1
Openings\The King's Indian Defense 6...Na6 Variation Part 2
Openings\The King's Indian Defense 6...Na6 Variation Part 3
Openings\The Modern Approach to Gambits 2  Initiative
Openings\The Modern Nimzowitsch
Openings\The Petroff Defence
Openings\The Pirc Defense - Part 1  Roman's System for White!
Openings\The Pirc Defense - Part 2  Take Away Counterplay!
Openings\The Pirc Defense - Part 3  The Classical 4. Nf3 and Be2!
Openings\The Pirc Defense - Part 4  Playing Against Roman's System!
Openings\The Pirc Defense - Part 5  The 4. Bc4 Variation
Openings\The Pirc Defense - Part 6  Facing 4. g3
Openings\The Road to GM - Part 3  vs GM Kuljasevic
Openings\The Schliemann Gambit - Part 1  Introduction!
Openings\The Schliemann Gambit - Part 2  Dealing with Prep!
Openings\The Schliemann Gambit - Part 3  Bonus Review!
Openings\The Schliemann Gambit - Part 4  vs GM Chirila!
Openings\The Schliemann Gambit - Part 5  Chucky's Example!
Openings\The Schliemann Gambit - Part 6  New White Weapon!
Openings\The Schliemann Gambit - Part 7  Final Review!
Openings\The Semi-Tarrasch 2  Supplementary Games and Ideas
Openings\The Stonewall - Part 1  White Fianchettos with Nh3
Openings\The Stonewall - Part 2  White Fianchettos with Nf3
Openings\The Stonewall - Part 3  The World Champ Attacks!
Openings\Thematic Openings  The Dark Square Repertoire - Part 1
Openings\Theoretical Statement in the Two Knights Defense
Openings\Trend-Breaking Novelties  Italian Game
Openings\Underrated Openings Part 1
Openings\Underrated Openings Part 2
Openings\Underrated Openings Part 3
Openings\Underrated Openings Part 4
Openings\Unexpected Opening Sacrifice
Openings\When and When Not To Use Computers 2


Rules and Basics\Achieving Full Board Awareness
Rules and Basics\Achieving Full Board Nirvana
Rules and Basics\Attracted By A Target 2
Rules and Basics\Chess Vocabulary  Pawn(s) Structure!
Rules and Basics\Claustrophobic Rook
Rules and Basics\Everything You Need to Know  Tactics   Strategy!
Rules and Basics\Fundamental Checkmates 1  Rook Roller and K+Q
Rules and Basics\Fundamental Checkmates 2  Rook and Bishop Pair
Rules and Basics\How to Analyze Your Own Games  For Beginners!
Rules and Basics\MA  Slave to your Preferences
Rules and Basics\Making Decisions In Early Stage of the Game
Rules and Basics\Member Analysis  Little Mistakes Lead to Big Mistakes!
Rules and Basics\No Exceptions
Rules and Basics\Pawn Structure 101  Every Opening Explained!
Rules and Basics\Play Chess Today! Part 2
Rules and Basics\Play Chess Today! Part I
Rules and Basics\The Basic Element of Space in Chess
Rules and Basics\The Big 3 - Important Winning Techniques


Strategy\Aaron Nimzowitsch; Not Pawns, Pieces
Strategy\Aaron Nimzowitsch; Not Pawns, Pieces 2
Strategy\Activity First!
Strategy\ALERT  Open Lines
Strategy\Amateur Game Review  Amateur's Mind 1
Strategy\Amateur Game Review  Amateur's Mind 2
Strategy\Amateur Game Review  Amateur's Mind 3
Strategy\Amateur Game Review  Amateur's Mind 4
Strategy\Amateur Game Review  Chess Crimes 1
Strategy\Amateur Game Review  Chess Crimes 2
Strategy\Amateur Game Review  Strategy vs. Tactics
Strategy\Attracted By A Target
Strategy\Attracted by Well Known Ideas
Strategy\Back to the Sicilian Scheveningen  vs IM Ginsburg
Strategy\Back To the Sicilian; Scheveningen v. NM Gutman
Strategy\Beauty at a Young Age
Strategy\Becoming an Expert - Part 6  Bad Calculation 2
Strategy\Believing in Logic
Strategy\Bishop vs. Knight; Fischer-Taimanov, 1971
Strategy\Boa Constrictor  Methodical Squeeze!
Strategy\Breaking Basic Rules in the Middlegame
Strategy\Circumstantial Initiative
Strategy\Coach Dejan Explains  Choosing the Right Plan!
Strategy\Coach Dejan Explains  Facing Unusual Openings!
Strategy\Coach Dejan Explains  How to Play Dynamically!
Strategy\Coach Dejan Explains  How to Trap the Rook!
Strategy\Coach Dejan Explains  Playing Against the IQP!
Strategy\Converting Extra Material
Strategy\Converting Extra Material II
Strategy\Converting Extra Material III
Strategy\Converting Extra Material V
Strategy\Counter Attack 1
Strategy\Counter Attack 2
Strategy\Counter Attack 3
Strategy\Counter Attack 4
Strategy\Couples In Chess
Strategy\Couples In Chess; Queen and Knight
Strategy\Creativity vs Dogmatism  A Self Reflection...
Strategy\Crime and Punishment in the Opening
Strategy\Deep Positional Understanding
Strategy\Defense   Prophylaxis 4  Sharp King's Indian!
Strategy\Defensive Tips  Active Counterplay!
Strategy\Defensive Tips  IM Amanov vs GM Khachiyan
Strategy\Developing Initiative In Early Stage of the Game
Strategy\Development  Attack and Defense
Strategy\Development  Attack and Defense 3
Strategy\Development  Attack and Defense 4
Strategy\Development  Attack and Defense 5
Strategy\Development Part 2  Open vs. Closed Positions
Strategy\Development Part 3  Fluid Positions
Strategy\Development Part 4  The Importance of Weaknesses
Strategy\Development Part 5  Quality
Strategy\Development Part 6  Getting Ahead
Strategy\Development Part I  Counting
Strategy\Dynamic Theory  GM Khachiyan v. IM Brooks
Strategy\Dynamic Theory  Logical Chain
Strategy\Empty Bishop
Strategy\Ending a Tournament
Strategy\Evaluation and Dynamic Thinking I
Strategy\Evaluation and Dynamic Thinking II
Strategy\Fighting for Initative
Strategy\Fighting for Initative 2
Strategy\Formulating a Favorable Pawn Structure
Strategy\Fundamental Concepts  Mobilization!
Strategy\General Strategy  The Open File!
Strategy\General Strategy  When To Exchange Pieces
Strategy\General Strategy The Bishop Pair
Strategy\Getting Lucky in Chess
Strategy\Getting Lucky in Chess 2
Strategy\Good and Bad Bishops; Averbakh v. Furman,1960
Strategy\Good and Bad Bishops; Ivanchuk v. Anand, 1992
Strategy\Good and Bad Bishops; Karpov v. Lautier
Strategy\Good and Bad Bishops; vs. IM Tate
Strategy\Greatest Chess Minds  Aron Nimzowitsch - Part 1
Strategy\Greatest Chess Minds  Aron Nimzowitsch - Part 2
Strategy\Greatest Chess Minds  Aron Nimzowitsch - Part 3
Strategy\Greatest Chess Minds  Aron Nimzowitsch - Part 4
Strategy\Greatest Chess Minds  Aron Nimzowitsch - Part 5
Strategy\Greatest Chess Minds  Aron Nimzowitsch - Part 6
Strategy\Greatest Chess Minds  Siegbert Tarrasch - Part 2
Strategy\Greatest Chess Minds  Wilhelm Steinitz - Part 5
Strategy\How  not  to Play in your Opponent's Time Trouble
Strategy\How To Avoid Quiescence Errors - Part 1
Strategy\How to be a Better Blitz Player
Strategy\How to Change the Course of the Game
Strategy\How to Exploit a Space Advantage - Part 1
Strategy\How to Exploit a Space Advantage - Part 2
Strategy\How To Improve Your Chess
Strategy\How To Improve Your Chess 2
Strategy\How To Improve Your Chess 3
Strategy\How to Think in the Endgame - Part 4
Strategy\How to Win 'Must Win' Games 1  The Ultimate Test!
Strategy\How to Win 'Must Win' Games 2  Avoiding the Draw!
Strategy\How to Win 'Must Win' Games 3  Young Shanky Wins!
Strategy\How to Win 'Must Win' Games 4  World Champ's Way!
Strategy\IM Shankland vs. IM Rensch, Again!
Strategy\Initiative vs. Material
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  Attacking Ideas Continued
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  BONUS Video
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  d4-d5 Pawn Breakthrough
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  Good and Bad Knights
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  Intro
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  Practical Examples 1
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  Practical Examples 2
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  Practical Examples 3
Strategy\Isolated Queen Pawns  Role Reversal
Strategy\Judgment and Planning Part 2  Slaying the Dragon
Strategy\Judgment and Planning Part 3  The Bayonet Attack
Strategy\Juicy Pawns on the Semi-Open Files
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 1
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 2
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 3
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 4
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 5
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 6
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 7
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 8
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 8 - Chess Videos - Chess.com2.mp4
Strategy\Learning from the Best  Tigran Petrosian Part 9
Strategy\Lessons of Defense
Strategy\Liu Analyzes  Chess.com Member Games
Strategy\Liu Analyzes  Chess.com Member Games 2
Strategy\Liu Analyzes  Chess.com Member Games 3
Strategy\Live Sessions; It's Not What You Do...
Strategy\Live Sessions; Lessons on Simple Chess
Strategy\Live Sessions; One Move at a Time
Strategy\Live Sessions; One Move at a Time 2
Strategy\Live Sessions; One Move at a Time 3
Strategy\Live Sessions; One Move at a Time 4
Strategy\Live Sessions; Race Attacks
Strategy\Live Sessions; Static vs. Dynamic Variations
Strategy\Loss for the Knight, Losing for the Horse 2
Strategy\Loss for the Knight... Losing the Horse!
Strategy\MA  Finding (and Using!) Your Advantages
Strategy\Maintaining The Inititative
Strategy\Maintaining The Inititative 2
Strategy\Making Consistent Plans  Game vs NM Manvelyan
Strategy\Materialism and Initiative in the Endgame
Strategy\Member Analysis  Absence of Logic
Strategy\Member Analysis  Amanultra v. Quale
Strategy\Member Analysis  Badly Placed Pieces
Strategy\Member Analysis  Defend with Counterplay!
Strategy\Member Analysis  Exigentsky v. Clarosdajang
Strategy\Member Analysis  Failure to Defend Actively!
Strategy\Member Analysis  Failure to Restrict Pieces
Strategy\Member Analysis  How to Play with Extra Material
Strategy\Member Analysis  Instructive Member Game
Strategy\Member Analysis  Intense Positional Struggle
Strategy\Member Analysis  Isolated Exceptions!
Strategy\Member Analysis  Managing Space!
Strategy\Member Analysis  Manjinit v. Takeosao
Strategy\Member Analysis  Manjinit v. Takeosao 2
Strategy\Member Analysis  Mistakes in the Sicilian
Strategy\Member Analysis  Ratings DON'T Matter!
Strategy\Member Analysis  Super Sharp Struggle
Strategy\Member Analysis  The Principles of a Race Attack!
Strategy\Member Analysis  The Race Continues...
Strategy\Member Analysis  Wrong Middlegame Plan
Strategy\Misplaying Middlegame Positions
Strategy\My Best Games  vs. GM Vitaly Tseshkovsky
Strategy\My Game vs. Tim Taylor
Strategy\My Pan-American Experience  vs IM Diego Rafael Di Berardino
Strategy\Nominal and Absolute Power of The Pieces
Strategy\Nominal and Absolute Power of The Pieces 2
Strategy\Nursing a Minimal Advantage 2
Strategy\Nursing a Minimal Advantage 3
Strategy\Opposite Bishop's in Middlegame
Strategy\Opposite Colored Bishop Domination
Strategy\Opposite Colored Domination
Strategy\Pawn Sacrifices  Playing to Win
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Caro-Slav 2
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Caro-Slav 3
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Caro-Slav 4
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Caro-Slav 5
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Caro-Slav 6
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Caro-Slav Finale!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Caro-Slav Intro
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Chain Reactions 3  Quiz!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Chain Reactions Part 1
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Chain Reactions Part 2
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Intro Complex
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Intro to the English   Yugoslav Attacking Formations!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Orthodox Minority Attack
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Panov-Botvinnik
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Scheveningen 2 - White's g4!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Scheveningen 3 - Modern Ideas!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Scheveningen 5 - Black's Ideas
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Scheveningen 6 - e4 Central Pressure!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Scheveningen 7 - White's Slow Play!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Scheveningen 8 - Tactical Finale!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  Scheveningen Intro!
Strategy\Pawn Structure 101  The Stonewall
Strategy\Planning in Chess
Strategy\Play Fighting Chess  Using the Initiative - Part 1
Strategy\Play the Board, Not Your Opponent - Part 1
Strategy\Playing With a Space Advantage
Strategy\Playing with a Space Advantage - Part 6
Strategy\Playing with a Space Advantage - Part 7
Strategy\Playing with a Space Advantage - Part 8
Strategy\Playing With a Space Advantage II
Strategy\Playing with a Space Advantage III
Strategy\Playing with a Space Advantage in Your Games!
Strategy\Playing with a Space Advantage IV
Strategy\Playing with a Space Advantage V
Strategy\Playing with Positional Advantage
Strategy\Positional Exchange Sacrifice
Strategy\Positional Operations  Regrouping
Strategy\Positional Operations  Releasing the Pieces
Strategy\Positional Operations; Strengthening
Strategy\Positional Sacrifice - Part 1  Pawn Avalanche!
Strategy\Positional Sacrifice - Part 2  School Me Twice, Shame on Me!
Strategy\Positional Sacrifice; FM Banawa v. GM Khachiyan
Strategy\Positional Sacrifice; GM Khachiyan v. FM David Luc
Strategy\Positional Sacrifice; GM Khachiyan v. Matikozian
Strategy\Practical Defense 1
Strategy\Practical Defense 2
Strategy\Practical Defense 3
Strategy\Practical Defense 4
Strategy\Practical Defense 5
Strategy\Practical Defense 7
Strategy\Practicing Prophylactic Thinking - Part 2
Strategy\Practicing Prophylactic Thinking!
Strategy\Restricting Bad Pieces 1
Strategy\Restricting Bad Pieces 2
Strategy\Restriction  2 v. 1 On the Queen-Side
Strategy\Restriction 2; Karpov vs. Kasparov WCH 1985
Strategy\Restriction; Winter v. Capablanca 1919
Strategy\Scientist or Fighter  Chess Personality Types - Part 1
Strategy\Scientist or Fighter  Chess Personality Types - Part 2
Strategy\Semi-Open Files... On Fire!
Strategy\Sensing the Critical Moment - Part 1
Strategy\Sensing the Critical Moment - Part 2
Strategy\Sensing the Critical Moment - Part 3
Strategy\Shankland's Summer Travels 4  vs GM Pawel Jaracz
Strategy\Sicilian Methods; e5 Push for White
Strategy\Sicilian Methods; e5 Push for White II
Strategy\Solitaire Chess - Part 2  Positional vs Attack, 1!
Strategy\Solitaire Chess - Part 3  Positional vs Attack, 2!
Strategy\Solitaire Chess - Part 4  Improving a Bad Position
Strategy\Spanish Torture; Part I
Strategy\Spanish Torture; Part II
Strategy\Stay Hungry - Part 3  Never Give Up Without a Fight!
Strategy\Straining the Bishop
Strategy\Structural Thinking
Strategy\Structural Thinking 2  Lessons from Capablanca
Strategy\Structural Thinking 3  Chain Domination!
Strategy\Subtleties of the Queen
Strategy\The Bishop Pair II
Strategy\The Break Point
Strategy\The Center in Chess 1
Strategy\The Center in Chess 2
Strategy\The Evaluation of a Position I; Karpov - Anand 199
Strategy\The Evaluation of a Position II; Capablanca - Alek
Strategy\The fly(FM) vs.The INDIAN-ELEPHANT(IM)
Strategy\The Heavy Pieces  Do Work!
Strategy\The Ideas Behind Planning
Strategy\The King in the Center
Strategy\The King in the Center 2
Strategy\The Power of the Center!
Strategy\The Principle of Two Weaknesses 1
Strategy\The Principle of Two Weaknesses 2
Strategy\The Principle of Two Weaknesses 3
Strategy\The Principle of Two Weaknesses 4
Strategy\The Road to Chess Improvements
Strategy\The Rook's Dream
Strategy\The Rooks Are Dreaming... Advanced Ideas!
Strategy\The Scheveningen Continued
Strategy\The Year of the Carlsen; Part 3
Strategy\Thinking Your Way to Chess Mastery
Strategy\Thinking Your Way to Chess Mastery 2
Strategy\Thinking Your Way to Chess Mastery 3
Strategy\Typical Plans with Opposite side Castling
Strategy\Unbalanced Material  Minor Pieces vs Pawns!
Strategy\Unbalanced Material  Minors vs Rook Part 1
Strategy\Unbalanced Material  Minors vs the Queen Part 2
Strategy\Unbalanced Material  Practical Exercises!
Strategy\Unbalanced Material  Queen vs Two Rooks!
Strategy\Unbalanced Material  Rooks vs Queen!
Strategy\Unusual Strategy and Tactics
Strategy\Vladimir Kramnik and Pawn Majorities
Strategy\When and When not to use Computer Chess Engines
Strategy\When to Exchange  Knight vs Bishop - Part 1
Strategy\When to Exchange  Knight vs Bishop - Part 2
Strategy\When to Trade Pieces 1  Simplify When Winning!
Strategy\When to Trade Pieces 2  Trading Off Defenders!
Strategy\When to Trade Pieces 3  Advanced Simplification!
Strategy\When to Trade Pieces 4  Defensive Trading!
Strategy\When to Trade Pieces 5  To Control Key Squares!
Strategy\When to Trade Pieces 6  Listen to Your Pawns!
Strategy\Win Equal Endings by Slowly Improving Your Pieces
Strategy\World Youth 2010; Vetoshko vs. Troff


Tactics\A Cautionary Tale
Tactics\A Nice Walk In the Park  Absolute Craziness
Tactics\Amazing Games for Beginners  Attack the Kingside 2
Tactics\Amazing Games for Beginners  Strike While the Iron
Tactics\Applying Principles In The King's Gambit I
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 10
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 11
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 12
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 3
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 4
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 5
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 6
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 7
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 8
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment - Part 9
Tactics\Beauty and Entertainment 2
Tactics\Chess960! v.2 (Fischer Random Chess)
Tactics\Converting Extra Material IV
Tactics\Copious Sacrifices, Middlegame Zugzwang, and Castl
Tactics\Development  Attack and Defense 2
Tactics\Dynamic Play 1  Key Decisions in Critical Moments
Tactics\Dynamic Play 2  Key Decisions in Critical Moments
Tactics\Exploring Tactical Motifs  The Greek Gift Sacrifice - Part 1
Tactics\Exploring Tactical Motifs  The Greek Gift Sacrifice - Part 2
Tactics\Greatest Chess Minds  Siegbert Tarrasch - Part 1
Tactics\How  not  to Play in your Opponent's Time Trouble
Tactics\How To Avoid Quiescence Errors - Part 2
Tactics\How To Avoid Quiescence Errors - Part 3
Tactics\How to Develop Your Sense of Danger!
Tactics\Imbalanced Play vs FM Liu
Tactics\Intermediate Checkmates
Tactics\Intermediate Checkmates 2
Tactics\Intermediate Checkmates 3
Tactics\Intermediate Checkmates 4
Tactics\Intermediate Checkmates 5
Tactics\Judgment and Planning Part 1  Meeting Aggression!
Tactics\Lasker's Combination
Tactics\Liu Analyzes Retter-Gyrow 2
Tactics\Live Sessions  Blindfold Mix!
Tactics\Live Sessions; Alekhine's Block
Tactics\Live Sessions; The Fast and the Furious
Tactics\Member Analysis  Sacrifice in the Sozin
Tactics\Member Analysis  Super Sharp Struggle II
Tactics\My Pan-American Experience  vs GM Isan Reynaldo Ortiz Suarez
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Basic Tactics - 1!
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Basic Tactics - 2!
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Beyond the Basics 1!
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Beyond the Basics 2!
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Mating Nets - 1!
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Mating Nets - 2!
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Mating Nets - 3!
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Mating Nets - 4!
Tactics\Patterns Everyone Must Know  Mating Nets - 5!
Tactics\Pawn Structure 101  Scheveningen 4 - Knightmares!
Tactics\Pawn Structure 101  Yugoslav Evolution - Part 1
Tactics\Practical Defense 6
Tactics\Tactics Do Grow On Strategies
Tactics\Tactics Do Grow On Strategies 2
Tactics\The 10 Best Moves of All Time  #6
Tactics\The Active King  Triumphal Walk Part 1
Tactics\The Art of Tempo Moves in Chess - Part 1
Tactics\The Art of Tempo Moves in Chess - Part 2
Tactics\The Art of Tempo Moves in Chess - Part 3
Tactics\The Art of Tempo Moves in Chess - Part 4
Tactics\The Art of Tempo Moves in Chess - Part 5
Tactics\The Crushing Rook Lift
Tactics\The Desperate Housewives
Tactics\The Rooks Dream of... a Breakthrough!
Tactics\The Technique of Calculation - Part 1
Tactics\The Technique of Calculation - Part 2
Tactics\The Technique of Calculation - Part 3
Tactics\The Technique of Calculation - Part 4
Tactics\The Technique of Calculation - Part 5
Tactics\The Technique of Calculation - Part 6
Tactics\Unbalanced Material  Minors vs Queen, Example Game
Tactics\Unbalanced Material  Principles in Practice!
Tactics\Unusual Top Level Combinations
Tactics\US Junior Championship I; v. FM Harper
Tactics\US Junior Championship II; v. FM John Bryant
Tactics\Using Computers 1
Tactics\Using Computers 2
by camerasrepairman
on Wed Nov 14, 2018 5:22 am
 
Search in: General
Topic: Chess.com Videos.
Replies: 17
Views: 4896

Crushing the King - Tryfon Gavriel, Igor Smirnov (Full)

Crushing the King - Tryfon Gavriel, Igor Smirnov (Full-368 mb unpacked):
https://dropmefiles.com/L6xjR

Password: CAISSA

All credit to gaurav_singh-m, c0unt3rpl4y, psrinivasan and cblove


WHY THIS COURSE WAS CREATED?

The attack is an art that every chess player should master. When we play a chess game it is very important to have the ability to start an attack in order to win the game. Many students have the problem on how to start the attack and deliver the final blow. They do not know how to provoke a weakness into his opponent’s King.
In this course, GM Igor Smirnov together with CM Tryfon will teach you the strategies and tactics of attacking. At the end of this course you will have all the necessary abilities and understanding in order to start a successful attack against an opponent of any level!

Is this course right for me?

The course is suitable for beginners and intermediate level players, but it will be helpful for advanced level players, too. Even if your ELO is 1900+, this course will help you improve your attacking skills and you’ll learn some new things.
If you want to improve your attacking skills and boost your chances of success, then this course is for you.

What you will learn?

How to plan an attack?
How to set the target for my attack?
What pieces should I include in the attack?
How to find the right attacking moves?
How can I get an attacking position?
How to finish the attack?
CONTENTS:



LESSON #1 Getting an attacking position out of the opening
LESSON #2 Provoking weaknesses around the opponent's king
LESSON #3 King Safety Aspects - Spectator pieces
LESSON #4 Kings safety aspects - King in the center
LESSON #5 The King Hunt and securing mating nets
LESSON #6 Centralised vs Spectator pieces
LESSON #7 Forcing moves
LESSON #8 How you can become a great attacker
LESSON #9 How can you get an attacking position?
LESSON #10 Your practical guide

MEET THE AUTHOR:

GM Igor Smyrnov

Igor Smirnov is a chess Grandmaster, coach, and holder of a Master’s degree in psychology. He’s the founder of the “Remote Chess Academy” company that has helped thousands of students worldwide to improve their results. GM Smirnov has developed lots of chess video lessons, articles, webinars and training courses.

CM Tryfon Gavriel

also known as “Kingscrusher” on the Internet. He is a FIDE Candidate Master (CM), British Regional Chess Master, and run a popular Youtube chess channel for many years.One of his earliest Over-the-board achievements in Chess was winning the Lloyds Under 18 national UK tournament in 1989.
by ChessCaissa
on Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:22 am
 
Search in: General
Topic: Crushing the King - Tryfon Gavriel, Igor Smirnov (Full)
Replies: 5
Views: 1752

Sicilian Defense by GM Mesgen Amanov

Please share this course for me caissa





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Friday, May 27, 2016

Improve Your Chess with GM Mesgen Amanov

GM Mesgen AmanovI recently discovered Grandmaster Mesgen Amanov's website, Improve My Chess. I was impressed with the quality of his videos, so I contacted him to see if he would like to share some information about himself here.


He graciously accepted my invitation. We cover a few areas including his early development as well as some of his best chess results (including an annotated game highlighting his preparation and in-game thoughts). We also discuss some general training advice and GM Amanov shares why he started coaching and Improve My Chess. 


I found GM Amanov to be very friendly and open with his answers. I hope you enjoy his responses.

Unless otherwise noted, the words are GM Amanov's.

Early Development


I started playing chess when I was 5 years old. My dad taught me, he was about 1800-2000 level. I was just playing against my dad all day, didn't really have any chess schedule or lessons, just played for fun. In my school chess was a curriculum, it was like any other class, math or literature etc. So was going to chess class once a week, obviously I was beating everyone in my grade, so it was again just for fun.

When I was 10 years old, my father passed away. I thought everything is over, but luckily I loved chess very much that I decided to go the chess club and study chess with more advanced kids.

Learning chess in Turkmenistan (this is where I am from) was very different from USA. We didn't have private coaches, we didn't even know it was possible. We learnt in a group of 6-12 kids from a local coach. We had good coaches, mostly from 2200-2400 level. So from age 10 to 15 I was in that chess club, withing those 5 years I became 2200. 

To be honest I feel like becoming 2200 wasn't hard at all. I only say that because becoming 2500 from 2200 is about 5 times harder than becoming 2200 from 0. 

I went to college when I was 15-16 years old. And being 2200 is like nothing special at that age if you want to become professional chess player. So at age of 15 I started seriously studying chess and by saying seriously I mean 6-8 hours a day. How is that possible you may ask me while attending college? So let me explain: I went to Sport and Tourism University in Turkmenistan, majoring in chess coach (yes, we have that major!) Smile 

Subjects were easy for me, my favorite was sport psychology, physiology and human anatomy. That allowed me to study chess all day. When I graduated university I was 19-20 years old and became International Master. I played bunch of International chess tournaments including World Youth, Chess youth Olympiads, Asian Championships etc.

Becoming a Grandmaster


At age 20 I came to USA to play in tournaments, I was still International Master. I studied enormous amount of chess here in Chicago with my friend GM Yury Shulman in average about 8 hours a day. 

Then I had to leave to play Chess Olympiad in Dresden in 2008. This was my most successful tournament, I had 7.5 points out of 8 with the performance of 2730! (FIDE rating). In 2009 I became a Grandmaster. 2010-2012 were by best years in my chess career. Those were the Years I professionally studied chess 6 hours a day.


In 2011, I had great performance between May and August. I got second place at Chicago Open (May) with more than 25 GMs, and Sargissian Gabriel from Armenia got first place. In July, I got third place at World Open with more than 30 GMs, first and second was shared between Kamsky and Michael Adams. In August, I placed second at the Metropolitan Invitational with more than 10 GMs, Michael Adams got first.


So after 2012, I was teaching more and more and my rating slowly started to drop. At some point I couldn't take any new students. I was completely booked, therefore no time to study chess on my own. Just teaching. 

The result of that is my rating dropped more than 150 points! My peak was 2614! And now I am below 2500. It is impossible to even keep your rating on the same level without studying. I feel like I know much more, but my calculation is not as deep, same as my concentration. Perhaps I will play again, but as for now my priority is teaching.

Bryan Castro: Mesgen shared the following game with us. Besides his excellent chess moves, pay particular attention to his comments as he provides much insight into the opening preparation and in-game decisions of a grandmaster. All of the annotations are GM Amanov's except in a couple spots where I make an observation.



Some General Thoughts about Chess Training


There are indeed many books written on openings, but I don't really think intermediate level players spend a lot of time on openings. Some teachers think so, but the level of opening preparation is pretty low here. But I agree that Middlegame and Endgame are more important to study first.


Bryan Castro: Here I had commented that a lot of amateur players focus a lot of their study on tactics.

And yes you are right people "spend" too much time doing tactics. Why is that wrong? Because chess player have to develop other areas of chess understanding. Going over Grandmaster games, study endgames manuals, play training game more often, learn about positional chess etc. Doing just tactics is just wrong.

Bryan Castro: Based on his background in sports psychology and physiology, I asked him about training mentally and physically for chess.


Attitude and Psychology in Chess


Psychology in chess is so important, sometimes even more than any preparation. If you go to the tournament in a good mood, motivated, striving to play best moves and ready to fight till the last move your chances on doing well are very very high. I've seen my students preparing so much, worrying about the tournament and when the time comes to play a game, they make very simple mistakes, blunders and no deep calculation, because their worries blocking everything. 

Being worried and sometimes scared is a big enemy that you need to overcome first. Before any tournament I am trying to cheer up my students, so they understand even if they lose a game, it's not the end of the world, it's just a game of chess. 

I am always encouraging them to play brave chess, attacking chess. If there is some interesting idea that they see, but afraid to proceed because of the result, I make sure to explain that experimenting is always good, it is a creative process. If their idea didn't work, at the very lest they learnt and next time they would know when to execute such idea or not. 

That's why it is important not to stressed out yourself before upcoming tournament, instead be excited about it and look forward to some fighting chess!


The Importance of Fitness and Chess



To be a good tournament player it is to be in a good physical shape. I often recommend to my students to read autobiographies of the famous chess players, like G. Kasparov, V. Anand, M. Carlsen etc.


These exceptional world Champions are in great physical shape. Gym 3-4 times a week, soccer and tennis 1-2 times a week, jogging and simply walking on the fresh air, all that helps to stay focused during the game. Endurance is very important especially for them, because their tournaments are very long. 


Here in USA, tournaments are short 2-4 days, but you play 10 hours of chess in one single day, that is very stressful for our organism, that's why our body has to be prepared.


I myself all my life have been very active in all sports. I used to do gym, swimming, table tennis, basketball, running, soccer, martial arts, volleyball, arm wrestling -- basically everything because I was in the Sport University, now I do gym, swimming and table tennis. Those are my favorites. 



Becoming a Chess Coach


In 2012, I opened chess academy in Glenview, IL. Idea is that kids from 6 to 18 years old could get together and study in a group. Over these 4 years I had about 20 Grandmasters (not just GMs, teaching GMs, it's a big difference) giving lectures in my academy. I was watching them all and tried to become even better learning from them. Some of them are OK teachers, some of them are really good. 

In 2015, I felt that it is time to share with the world with my teaching experience. Why did I feel it was the time? Within those years I raised so many Experts and Masters and couple International Masters, raised one World Champion. All my private students are the state Champions. So I didn't need any more proof or push to start something that will change dramatically teaching of chess.


Launching ImproveMyChess.com


In September 2015, me and my partner Gary Aranovich, a very talented idea developer, computer guru and just a good friend, launched the Improvemychess.com program. 

Now after 9 months since launching we've received hundreds of amazing feedback. Chess players truly expressing their desire to work more and harder on chess. If chess players are not serious about their improvement my program is not for them. But if someone is seeking in real improvement my program will help 100%. I can see it for myself how our members becoming stronger and stronger, I just see it by their rating. 

My chess philosophy in teaching is very simple: to make my students happy. If I deliver the best lessons with the right information, to make sure my students understand the subject, to make sure they will be able to use it in their games.

What do I enjoy most about my teaching? To be honest...the results. I enjoy when my students say to me: "Mesgen I did so great at the tournament!!!" with a huge smile on their face. Nothing else matters to me,  I just want them to be happy.

The best way to contact me is through official page: www.improvemychess.com there is link "Contact me" 


This was a big interview, but very sincere. I could write much more, but the reader's time is precious. If you are that reader who wants to get better at chess and increase his/her rating, go to my site, sign up for free lessons and see it for yourself.


Conclusions


Thank you, Mesgen, for your generosity in the time you spent responding and sharing your thoughts with us. Through interacting with GM Amanov and watching his videos, I have found him to be friendly and sincere in his desire to help his students improve.


In this interview, GM Amanov shared many useful tips for improving our chess, including:

The importance of consistency in our study and trainingHaving a positive attitude and perspective before our tournament gamesThe importance of fitness and endurance for tournament playersHaving a balance in our chess training and not focusing on one area to the detriment of othersInsights into preparation for an opponent


I hope you will check out improvemychess.com and see if the program can fit into your chess training schedule. The instruction is top notch - his students' results speak for themselves. 


Your Turn


I hope you enjoyed this interview with GM Mesgen Amanov. If you have questions for GM Amanov, please contact him at improvemychess.com or feel free to leave comments here and I will forward them to him.


If you did enjoy this article, please share it with others. Also, check out my otherinterviews with masters. Until next time, I wish you good luck and good chess!

Bryan Castro 4 comments:

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Monday, May 23, 2016

How to Play Solitaire Chess with SCID

Introduction


One of the best ways to improve at chess is Solitaire Chess. Solitaire Chess is a training method where you play through a master game as the winner and try to guess the move. This training method has been around for a long time and is an incredible tool for improvement.

I wrote an extensive guide to Solitaire Chess on GM Nigel Davies' Chess Improver site, so I won't go into detail about Solitaire Chess here. Instead, I'd like to show you how you can use SCID's "Review game" feature to make Solitaire Chess more effective and fun.

SCID is a free and very powerful database, and I've been experimenting with it a lot lately. For more information, I wrote an introduction to SCID.

Step-by-Step Instructions


Step #1: Prepare your source material.

To play Solitaire Chess on SCID, you need to have a game in a database to play. If you are using a physical book, you can look up the game in your database or an online database such as Chess Tempo or chessgames.com. Then just open up the game by double clicking in your game list window.


SCID's Game List Window

Step #2: Move to the Starting Position

Trying not to look at the game notation (so your peripheral vision doesn't catch too many of the moves), use the right arrow key to move the game to the position where you want to start playing Solitaire Chess. Here are some ideas for where you may wish to start.

If the game is within your opening repertoire, you can start at move 1 if you wish, but may wish to move it forward several moves if the game uses a different move order than the one you use within your repertoire.For most games, you may want to play through the first 10-15 moves so that you start in the early middlegame.If you want to focus on the endgame, move foreward until it looks like you are transitioning from the middlegame to endgame. This could be anywhere between moves 30-40 depending on the specific game.

Also you need to orient the board to the side you want to play. For example, if you will be playing the Black side during the game, you need to rotate the board by clicking on the board option button on the lower right of the board module - see the screenshot below.


Rotate the Board to play Black


Step #3: Select the Game Review Option in the Play Menu

Click on the Play menu. Hover on the Training option and it will reveal another menu. Click on the Review Game option. 





Once you select this, the Game Review module will pop up.

Game Review WindowYou do not need to worry about the settings very much. Because you will often be using a chess book to consult after your Solitaire Chess game, you do not need to (nor should you) rely on the chess engine analysis. However, at some points the engine analysis will be useful and you can further analyze it once you have completed playing through your game.

Step #4: Play Through the Game

The computer will take several seconds (depending on the "time" setting) to calculate its response. After that you will see "Enter your move." There is no time limit other than what you may determine for yourself, so play through the game as if you were playing in a tournament or online game. 


Once you make your move on the board, it will let you know whether or not you played the move in the game score. If not, you may have matched the engine's top score, and it will let you know as well. Also, any moves that are within a certain range (that you can adjust) of the game move or the engine move will be indicated with "You did not choose the engine move, but it was a good move."


If you do not select one of these moves or a blunder you will also be notified. This information, including the engine analysis when you blunder, will be added to the game score. This will be essential for post-mortem analysis.


Step #5: Analyze Your Results

After you are finished playing, you will see how many of the moves you picked correctly. If you wish, you can record this in a spreadsheet to see your improvement over time. More importantly, you should go to the moves where you did not select the best moves and using your chess book and the engine analysis, try to understand your mistakes. Check out my Solitaire Chess guide for more details on this. 


Analyze Your Performance

As mentioned before, I recommend that you not rely on the chess engine variations, but they may be a good place to start to show you what you have missed in your own analysis during the game. Often, well annotated games in chess books will show you interesting or critical variations. When you are finished analyzing, your game score might look something like the one above.

Step #6: Adjust Your Training and Study

This step is ongoing. As you continue to play Solitaire Chess along with your other training, you may notice some patterns of common errors that you make. If you can find these, perhaps with the help of a chess coach or stronger player, you can adjust your training and study to strengthen these areas of weakness.

Here are some examples of errors you might want to look for:

Specific tactical themes - Do you make moves that lead to common tactics such as a pin or fork? Do you miss the opportunity to win material?Specific positional themes - Do you miss opportunities to grab the two bishops when appropriate?Mistakes in the endgame - Are there basic endgame positions you don't know how to play (e.g. Lucena and Philidor positions)?Mistakes in specific opening structures - Do you know what to do in Sicilian pawn structures or which pawn breaks to use in the French or King's Indian Defense?

Chess improvement is an ongoing project, so finding a way to categorize and eventually reduce these frequently occuring mistakes will be very helpful over time.


Final Thoughts


Solitaire Chess is a great way to practice your chess skills as well as study great master games. SCID's Review Game mode is a fun and effective way to play Solitaire Chess. With these steps, you will be able to maximize your learning and results with this training method. This way of training is not easy, but regular Solitaire Chess including follow-up analysis will pay great dividends for your future chess development.

Resources


Measure and Improve Your Chess: Here are some ideas you may want to use to record your progress in Solitaire Chess.


4-Steps to Analyzing Your Games for Improvement: Analyzing your Solitaire Chess game is similar to analyzing your other chess games, and this guide can help you get the most out of the post-mortem analysis.


Think Like a Grandmaster by Alexander Kotov: This classic book explores a lot of chess topics, but goes into a bit of detail about types of analysis. Kotov describes exercises that are actually a variation of Solitaire Chess and attributes much of his development to employing these training methods.

Bryan Castro 5 comments:

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Saturday, May 14, 2016

Measure and Improve Your Chess

Optimize Your Chess Training



What gets measured, gets managed. - Peter Drucker


Several years ago, I was teaching a novice chess player the basics of chess. Although he loved chess and enjoyed our lessons, he never played a rated game. He played a lot of casual blitz and nonrated chess on the Internet Chess Club, but he never played a rated game. 


He often asked me how strong I felt he was. I basically told him that the only real way to know was to play some rated games and see where he stood. I encouraged him to do so partly because he kept asking me my opinion about his strength, but also because I believed that the competition would help him to get better. (You can read about why I believe that playing competitively helps your chess).


Well, after a few months, we amicably decided to part ways. He sent me a message about the lessons he was taking with a grandmaster who said he was probably a "Class B" player. Of course, I checked his profile and there were no rated games played.


Now I really didn't care whether he played a rated game either on the internet or over-the-board (although I think he really would have enjoyed the competition). The point behind this story is that you really don't know how you're doing on almost anything unless you measure it.


There's a reason why top performers in many high-stakes arenas such as business and professional sports measure everything - because it works! In this article, I will discuss how we can use measurement to improve our chess. 


How Measurement Can Improve Your Chess

There are two main ways that measurement helps you. First, when you measure what you want to accomplish, it motivates you (when done properly). Second, measurements can be prescriptive and help guide you in what you need to work on.


What You Measure, Gets Done

I first started measuring my activities when I started my career in business. I measured my calls, number of appointments, and results. I also applied this to physical fitness, measuring my minutes ran, sets and reps of my weightlifting exercises, and things like how many servings of vegetables I consumed daily. 


I think people in general like to see a numerical representation of their accomplishments. Think about your last over-the-board tournament when you played someone you didn't know. Either you or your opponent probably asked what each other's rating was (unless you copied it from the crosstables). 


I remember when I first started playing tournament chess. I couldn't wait until my rating was updated on the cover of my Chess Life magazine. When I started playing, the ratings weren't updated very often, so it also taught me patience.


Once you start using measurement for more than seeing your rating, you will find yourself accomplishing more than you could have imagined. We'll discuss what to measure in a little bit.

How Do You Know if You're Getting Better?

Besides the motivational benefits of measuring your activities (which would be worth measuring in itself), you can also use measurement to track your improvement in specific areas of chess, as well as tracking specific activities. 


Once you measure your activities and results in chess, you can start to make comparisons over time and adjust your training program. Accurate measurements can help you make very specific and effective changes to your regimen. Without measurement, you're just guessing.


What Should You Measure?


There are a ton of things you can measure, but where should you start? Before we can answer that, let me discuss two different types of measurements:

Performance measuresOutcome measures

Performance (or frequency) measures track the frequency or amount of an activity. This type of measurement is called a leading indicator as an increase in these typically happen before the desired change - in this case, improvement in a specific area. Here are some examples of chess related performance measures:

Number of tactical problems solvedNumber of annotated master games studiedAmount of time spent analyzingNumber of blitz games played (for me this is a "negative" indicator as I am trying to decrease my volume of blitz play)Amount of time spent studying

Outcome measures track the results of an activity. These are lagging indicators as they often follow from activity performed before. Here are a few examples:

Chess Tempo tactical ratingsNumber of blunders made during a gameBullet, Blitz, and Standard RatingsSelf-rating of levels of focus or attention during a gameMagnitude of errors made during a game (e.g. measured using a chess engine)

These are just a few examples that I am currently using or have used in the past. In general, you will want to use a mix of performance and outcome measures. 


Use performance measures when you want to increase (or decrease) the frequency of an activity. For example, Here are a couple examples of ways I've used these:

I felt that I was playing too much and not studying enough, so I started tracking how many minutes I either played, trained, or studied chess. I found after about a month that 25% of my chess time was spent playing, which was much lower than I expected (and perhaps as a result of measuring it in the first place). Below is an excerpt of the spreadsheet I used - created on Microsoft Excel. I found out I don't play enough!

I felt I wasn't sleeping enough and this was effecting my chess. I've started tracking when I go to bed and when I get up, and the spreadsheet calculates how much sleep I got that night. Ever since I started tracking this, the amount and quality of my sleep has increased, and so has my chess!

Use outcome measures to calibrate your chess activities as well as motivation to see your progress. Improvement in chess is a long term project (at least for most of you who are reading this article), and sometimes it is hard to stay patient. Using periodic measurement of outcomes can show you that you are progress, even though it seems slower than you would like.


Below is an excerpt of my current ratings tracking sheet. I've highlighted a calculation I do to show how much I've improved on a weekly basis and on a rolling 6-week basis. Doing this helps me stay consistent and motivated on the long journey.


Slow but gradual improvement


Once I've attained statistics for several months, I can start to make certain comparisons to see how my activities are affecting the results.


You can get really creative with measurement, but remember that these are only tools to our greater objective - to improve at chess.


Getting Started with Measuring Your Chess

Now that you understand the difference between performance and outcome measures, here are a few steps to follow when getting started.


Step #1: Assess Your Needs

Before you incorporate measurement into your chess improvement program, assess what you need to improve. This should start with an objective review of your games - perhaps with a coach if you have one. 


Where do you need to improve - tactics, positional play, endgame, openings? 


Are there certain chess improvement activities you know you should do but don't? 


The answers to these questions are great places to start measuring.

Step #2: Start Simple

Maybe it's just me, but measuring my chess activities has become fairly enjoyable. However, I encourage you to start simply with just a few measures. After you've assessed your needs, you can start with your most pressing need.


For example, after you've made a comprehensive review of your game, you decide that you want to improve your chess tactics. We all know that solving tactical problems is an effective way to improve our ability in this area. We can create a simple spreadsheet with the following measures:

Number of tactical problems (or amount of time spent on tactics)Number solved correctlyRating (if using a program that gives a rating such as Chess Tempo)

Step #3: Use Performance Measures First and Often

Typically, we want to measure what we want to improve or increase. This often involves adding to our current program. Use performance measures to track these. Track these daily. Don't worry if you miss a day. Over time, you'll develop consistency and your progress will follow.

Step #4: Measure Outcomes Regularly but not too Often

As you develop the habits you want within your chess activities, use the appropriate outcome measures to track your progress. For example, the various tactics servers on the internet often give ratings. You can enter your rating on regular intervals (e.g. once a week or once a month) and see your steady progress.

I would set a specific day of the week or month to record outcome metrics. I caution you against doing it too often. If you record these measures too often, you might find yourself getting discouraged as your improvement may be too gradual to notice in shorter time periods. Similarly, when it comes to ratings, there are often peaks and valleys, but a longer interval (such as monthly or quarterly for OTB ratings) will show a more useful trend line.

Step #5: Assess and Adjust

Once you've started measuring your activities and results for several months, you can start to evaluate the effectiveness of your training.

For example, suppose you are tracking your tactical rating on a server and your OTB chess rating (or say a standard rating on ICC or chess.com). If you notice that your tactical rating is improving dramatically while your chess rating stagnates, it would be reasonable to conclude that tactics are not your biggest weakness.

For another example, I found that I was "testing" myself too much - doing tactical problems are analytical exercises - but not "studying" - reading chess books and looking up games - enough.

The positive side of this was that my ability to assess and come up with plans at the board was improving. However, I was often finding myself in situations - particularly between the opening and middlegame - where I knew I had played similar positions, but felt like I had to figure it out again. It was like I had to reinvent the wheel over and over again.

So I shifted some of my training time toward looking master games in the lines I was playing. Here I could see what much stronger players did in similar situations and adjusted my thinking and my approach for future games.

I wouldn't have realized this in my training had I not meticulously measured how much time I was spending on each part of my training and study program.

Long Term Project

Improving at chess is a long term project - unless you happen to be one of those teenage grandmasters. If you want to systematically and accurately improve your play, start by measuring aspects of your training and play.


Metrics and statistics are tools. Some people I know (and myself at times) get too caught up in the how and why of statistics. When I first got into this, I felt like I spent almost as much time measuring as I did studying and playing chess. 


I recommend starting with one simple rule: Measure what you want to improve. 


Use the steps above to pick just one or two areas that you want to see a dramatic improvement. Measurement can be very powerful, so be careful of what you measure. One of my friends started tracking various aspects of his tactical training. Unfortunately, now he only does tactics and barely plays! You have been warned.


Your Turn

If you decide to try out some of this advice, I'd love to hear what measures you are using and how it's helping you. If you enjoyed this article and want more elaboration on how to go about this, let me know what you need help with and I'll write more articles detailing this process. 


Good luck and good chess!


Resources

Here are a couple articles you might find helpful:


4 Steps to Analyzing Your Game for Improvement: This is an article I wrote on how to analyze your games and if you don't already do this, it will be hard to know where to start measuring.


Pat Riley on the Remarkable Power of Getting 1% Better: James Clear wrote an interesting article on Pat Riley's philosophy that shows the power of gradual but consistent improvement and the importance of measurement.


Bryan Castro 4 comments:

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Thursday, May 5, 2016

Interview with National Master Jim West

Meeting an Independent Chess Thinker

National Master Jim West

When you want to learn something, like chess, it is often good to follow in the footsteps of those who have achieved what you are aiming for. With that in mind, I asked National Master Jim West, the prolific author of the chess site Jim West on Chess, to share some of his thoughts on chess. 


Jim was very thoughtful and insightful in his answers. His passion for chess was very evident to me and his conviction on certain chess subjects was refreshing. 


Our interview covers a few topics, including Jim's start in chess, progressing to the master level, his chess books, and of course some advice on training and improvement in chess.


On a side note, he has posted on his site every single day since 2007 (and the last few days of 2006). Now that's dedication!


Starting Out in Chess

Jim, how did you learn to play chess and how old are you when you first started?


At approximately age seven, I learned the moves by hanging out at the playground during the summer and watching the older kids play chess in the shade when it became too hot to play baseball.  


At age twenty-one, I joined the U.S. Chess Federation and the Marshall Chess Clubin October 1972, in the aftermath of the Spassky-Fischer match.


As you progressed in chess, who were your chess heroes?


Early on, my chess hero was world champion Bobby Fischer.  My prize at the first tournament that I won was two chess books.  I chose My 60 Memorable Games and Bobby Fischer's Chess Games. Both books were studied intensely by me.  


In later years, I became aware of Paul Morphy's brilliance through my researching of the Philidor Counter Gambit which Morphy championed.


Do you have any favorite games from Fischer or Morphy?


My favorite Fischer game is game six against Spassky from their 1972 match.  The film Pawn Sacrifice claims it is the greatest chess game ever played which is a bit of an exaggeration, but it might well be the greatest chess game ever played by Bobby Fischer.  It is like a well choreographed ballet in which Fischer's pieces dance around Spassky's.


Here you can view this wonderful game. Annotations by Bryan Castro with his own analysis as well as analysis and commentary from several sources including Jim West's video on the game. I also adopted material from Yasser Seirawan's annotations from his excellent book Winning Chess Brilliancies. and videos by Life Master AJ Goldsby and kingcrusher.




My favorite Morphy game is his Philidor Counter Gambit win against Thomas Barnes.  I think of it as the French Revolution game because Morphy sends his minor and major pieces to the guillotine while his lowly peasant of a pawn emerges triumphant.  Considering that Philidor called pawns "the soul of chess," this game is the quintessential Philidor Counter Gambit.


Below is that exciting game with annotations by Bryan Castro.




Master Level Chess

What were your most successful chess results?


In 1990, I finished first in a Futurity at Elmwood Park, New Jersey.  This was my best personal result. 


As a team player, my best result happened in 1999 when I played board one on the winning team at the U.S. Amateur Team East tournament in Parsippany, New Jersey.


Do you have a favorite game that you played?


I have two favorites.  Playing as Fischer did in game fifteen against Spassky in 1972, I defeated FIDE master Brian Hartman (who later became an international master) at the 1990 World Open in Philadelphia. It appeared in Informant 50, annotated by FIDE Master Rudy Blumenfeld.  


Below you can examine Jim's battle against Mr. Hartman. Almost all of the annotations are Jim West's (which you can view from his original post on the Jim West on Chess blog) with just a few comments by Bryan Castro. (Bryan: I hesitated to add anything to Jim's excellent annotations, and my additions reflect only my humble attempts to understand the complexities of this game)



My second favorite is my win with the Philidor Counter Gambit against 2300-rated Greg Achonolu at the USATE 1999.


Check out this complex game below. Annotations by Michael Goeller originally posted on the Kenilworth Chess Club site.Morphy would be proud!




Tell us about your books on the Philidor Counter Gambit.


In 1996, the Chess Journalists of America awarded me top prize in the Best Analysis, Openings category for my articles in Atlantic Chess News on the Philidor Counter Gambit.  For a few months in 1994, my first book The Philidor Counter Gambit (Chess Enterprises) was a best seller at the USCF.  


Two years later, I authored The Dynamic Philidor Counter-Gambit (Chess Digest), mainly to include analysis of the 4.exf5 variation which had been omitted from my first book since no one ever played it against Paul Morphy.  


My experience in writing these books is that I received a few positive book reviews but some negative ones as well from critics who, by their own admission, have never played this opening in their lives.  Why these critics would think that an opening system invented by Francois-Andre Danican Philidor (who was a chess immortal) is unsound is something that I still have difficulty in understanding, unless their dislike of Paul Morphy who championed it is the real issue.  


The critics would have it that I must prove the playability of the Philidor Counter Gambit, despite the fact that I have a plus score of better than 250 after more than 900 over the board games with this opening.  


But, in my opinion, the burden of proof is squarely on the shoulders of the critics because the Philidor name brand is strong everywhere else. Philidor's defense to the King's Gambit is highly regarded in opening theory. In the middlegame, Philidor contributed the smothered checkmate known as Philidor's Legacy.  His analysis of the  Philidor drawing position in rook and pawn endings, as well as his analysis of the ending involving rook and bishop versus rook, is definitive.  


Why would the critics think that Philidor was wrong about his Counter Gambit when he was right about all of the above?


Chess Training and Progress


What type of training or study helped you to move from a Class B or Class A player to Expert and eventually to the Master-level rating?


The answer is simple: by playing a lot of games and then studying them, often with the help of my opponent during post mortem analysis. I never took a chess lesson in my life because I could not afford the expense.  But I read as many chess books as I could, often borrowing them from the public library.  


The final litmus test for my attaining the title of national master was thinking for myself.  Most players who never become master are too afraid to think independently.


Please elaborate on independent thinking.


By thinking independently, I am reminded of past conversations with two experts, both of them knowing as much about chess as I do but neither of them ever attaining the title of national master.


The first expert told me that he agreed with my analysis of the line in the Najdorf variation seen in Hartman - West, Philadelphia 1990, but that he would never play the line himself until grandmaster Eduard Gufeld included it in his book on the Sicilian defense.  


The second expert agreed with my opinion that a sharp variation in the Philidor Counter Gambit is playable for Black, but then he immediately contradicted himself by saying that the line must be better for White because that was the opinion of Carl Schlechter.  


Far from being masters, these two experts were slaves to the opinions of other chess players.


Chess Advice

What advice would you give to beginning players to improve?


Try to survive the opening.  I recommend the King's Indian Attack as White, a safe way to reach an equal middlegame.  Devote your study time to middlegame strategy and endgame technique.  Too much time is spent nowadays on opening theory.



Regarding studying the middlegame and endings, are there any particular books you would recommend or that you use with your students?

The middlegame game books that I recommend are Simple Chess by Michael Stean, Modern Chess Strategy by Ludek Pachman, and My System by Aron Nimzovich.  The best endgame books are Endgame Strategy by Mikhail Shereshevsky and Silman's Complete Endgame Course by Jeremy Silman.



Contacting Jim West

I see you also coach chess. What is your teaching philosophy or approach?


My teaching philosophy is to spend as little time as possible in studying opening theory and devoting as much time as possible to studying the middlegame and endgame books mentioned above.


How can potential students contact you?


I offer private lessons and group lessons at residences of students in the northern New Jersey area, as well as on-line lessons at the Internet Chess Club, using Skype for video and audio communication. Interested parties can contact me by e-mail at jimrwest(at)msn.com. 


You can also contact Jim through his chess site: Jim West on Chess.


Conclusion

Thank you for your interesting responses, Jim. I think chess players of all levels can appreciate the beautiful games you shared as well as benefit from your advice and insight into getting better at chess. 


Here are some of the highlights of Jim's advice:

Play a lot of chess and (perhaps just as importantly) study your games afterward.Don't spend too much time learning opening theory. Playing an opening such as the King's Indian Attack will help you achieve a playable middlegame without a lot of theory to learn.Focus your study time on the middlegame and endgame.Learn to think for yourself - don't be a slave to others' opinions.

As a corollary to the final point, chess can often be thought of as creative expression of ourselves. Learn from others, but be yourself. From reading his site and this interview, Mr. West has done just that. 


Your Turn

I hope you enjoyed this interview. Please share it with others if you did. Also, check out my other interviews with chess masters!

Bryan Castro No comments:

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by barathi
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Topic: Sicilian Defense by GM Mesgen Amanov
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MAGNUS CARLSEN The Journey of A World Champion by IM David Miedema

Topics tagged under 4 on chessgod101 Captur10


This purchase was only possible, because of the generosity of the following contributors. Let us hope that this forum with it's great spirit of community, teamwork and sharing lives long. Please add +1 reputation and thanks to them all. To make this easier, against each name I have put the original post in the request thread where they offered their contribution:

palomine - contributed $13 http://immortalchess.net/forum/showp...58&postcount=4
bedogus - contributed $7 http://immortalchess.net/forum/showp...45&postcount=3
Gambit_man - contributed $5 http://immortalchess.net/forum/showp...69&postcount=2


"MAGNUS CARLSEN The Journey of A World Champion by IM David Miedema

http://www.thechessworld.com/superch...n-the-journey/





WHY THIS COURSE WAS CREATED?

It is no secrets that knowing the history of the game and analyzing games played by the best players is a crucial ingredient of big success. In order to make your chess understanding deeper, it is important to learn the new techniques and ideas, especially from the great players. It was demonstrated over and over again that learning from the greatest players makes all the difference in the world if you want to improve at chess. And Magnus Carlsen is sure not a player to be missed out on this ‘Elite’ category; his achievements say it all! In this new course, IM David Miedema is breaking down some of the most instructive Magnus Calrsen's games, analyzes the critical moments and reveals how you can use the very same plans and ideas to score more wins in your own games!

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN
Magnus Carlsen's special winning style and how you can use it in your games to score big wins
How to think like Grandmaster and find the deep positional moves which will give you a huge advantage in the long-run
How to find the winning move when you have the advantage [a secret weapon that Carlsen uses to beat super-GMs and you can as well]
How to think and play amazing endgames using the "Magnus Method"
And much more!

CONTENTS

LECTURE #1 - Early Years (20 minutes)
LECTURE #2 - Road to Top GM (18 minutes)
LECTURE #3 - Becoming world's no.1 (30 minutes)
LECTURE #4 - Amazing endgames (26 minutes)
LECTURE #5 - Stress at the fortress (14 minutes)
LECTURE #6 - Cracking Karjakin (23 minutes)
LECTURE #7 - Conclusions (7 minutes)

8 practical tasks (over 100 games)

THE BOOK - PDF book covering contents of the course is included.


7 x mp4 video files with total running time = 2 hours 11 minutes

Package (videos + practical lessons + PDF) with full mp4 video file size = 381Mb

Package (videos + practical lessons + PDF)with reduced mp4 "tiny" video file size for anyone using mobile device or wants smaller download volume = 89Mb

(NOTE: because the original files are very good quality with large frame size (1920 x 1080p) I have been able to achieve ~ 75% reduction in file size with no obvious loss of video quality for the "tiny" compared to the full size. Any further reduction in size beyond this would probably begin to adversely affect the video quality)



Download

IMPORTANT PLEASE READ: This one is not presented just as a set of videos but as a course that you can work through. So in the download you will see there a file "autorun.exe" which you double click and it will open up a nice graphical interface menu that will guide you through the course. This is a portable stand alone application and doesn't install anything on your computer. This graphical menu contains links out to the 7 video lessons, the practical tasks + puzzles and the PDF book version of the whole course. Use this menu and follow the presented instructions.

If you don't want to view it as a course using the graphical interface and just want to view the 7 video lectures then ignore the autorun.exe application and you will find just the mp4 video files in the folder AUTOPLAY/VIDEOS.


Package with full video file size = 381Mb
Password for all files: immortalchess
( Best to re-type the password but if you copy & paste please be very careful make sure you do not include any spaces at the beginning or the end, before reporting that the password doesn't work ! )

Solidfiles Links:
MAGNUS CARLSEN Journey of World Champion.7z

Alternative ZIPPYSHARE Links:
Solidfiles is a much better format as the links last a lot longer but I know that some members in India have been having trouble with solidfiles so I have also uploaded to Zippyshare links. I have had to split them into 200Mb files due to the Zippy sile constraint.
First download both 4 parts and put them in the same folder before you try to extract. Now use 7-Zip or Winrar to extract part 001 and the rest will extract automatically. You do not need to extract part 002:
MAGNUS CARLSEN Journey of World Champion_Zippy.7z.001 zippyshare.com/v/YyzkzGQN/file.html
MAGNUS CARLSEN Journey of World Champion_Zippy.7z.002 zippyshare.com/v/IdCL2nyN/file.html


Package with reduced "tiny" video file size = 89Mb
Password for all files: immortalchess
( Best to re-type the password but if you copy & paste please be very careful make sure you do not include any spaces at the beginning or the end, before reporting that the password doesn't work ! ) XXX

Solidfiles Link:
MAGNUS CARLSEN Journey of World Champion_small.7z https://www.solidfiles.com/v/7adVeKvYvPQ6X

Alternative ZIPPYSHARE Link:
MAGNUS CARLSEN Journey of World Champion_small.7z
zippyshare.com/v/9E6gK2yn/file.html

Enjoy

Gambit_man



File size: 286 MB (381 MB unzipped)

Download

zippyshare.com/v/iYW1R7Xb/file.html
zippyshare.com/v/LSAUjhy6/file.html

pw - immortalchess
by jiri
on Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:58 am
 
Search in: General
Topic: MAGNUS CARLSEN The Journey of A World Champion by IM David Miedema
Replies: 0
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